Mary Newsom

This weekend there were a couple of walks held in Charlotte to help residents pay attention to a particular part of their neighborhoods.  WFAE’s Sarah Delia checked out one of the walks that aimed to teach and show what exactly lives in our creeks. 

NC Office of State Budget and Management

Governor Pat McCrory released his budget plan, his proposal for how the state should spend money for the next two years. It distributes more than $45 billion from the state’s general fund, or more than $100 billion when including all the other fees, federal dollars, and various revenue streams the state uses to fund services. The final budget may look quite a bit different once state lawmakers are through, but this proposal is where the debate begins. 


Plastics And The Environment

May 9, 2014

Plastics have become a huge part of our lives, whether in the form of bottles, bags, or packaging. The hope is that these items are reused or recycled, but recycling programs can be expensive, and many items end up in landfills or, worse, in our waterways. Our guests today are working to educate people on what happens to plastics. We meet a representative from NOAA’s Marine Debris Program, an artist who uses plastic debris to create environmental art, and a local sustainability officer.

JK Killia (left) Jim deVries (right) / 2014 Mecklenburg County State of the Environment Report

Mecklenburg County has some new residents. Animals not native to the county have moved in over the past couple of decades. One possible reason is climate change.


Every two years Mecklenburg County does an environmental assessment and delivers an environmental report card of sorts. The report card for the last two years has just been released and we’ll meet with two officials to see how our region fared in Air, Land, Water and Waste use and efficiency. In most aspects the county has fared well but the recession did have an impact in some areas. We’ll find out which ones, what aspects of our environment passed with flying colors and what has room for improvement. We check the county’s environmental grade.

PCB Worries Put SC Sludge Fertilizer On Hold

Oct 3, 2013
Betsy Hill/Charlotte-Mecklenburg Utilities Department

There's a lot of sludge in South Carolina that's destined for landfills. That's because the sludge produced from some wastewater treatment plants has tested positive for PCBs.

When we first met Carbon Nation director Peter Byck last year, we learned about his cross country journey to meet people who were trying to reduce their carbon footprint whether they believed in global warming or not. He'll join us again on the next Charlotte Talks to talk about why getting the message out about climate change is still such a challenge and about initiatives being made by companies around the country (some that might come as a surprise to you!) to change the way we think about energy and the environment.

Duke Energy

Duke’s Edwardsport plant in Indiana is a “coal gasification” plant, meaning the coal gets turned into a gas and some of the pollutants get filtered out, before moving into the turbine.  Company spokesman Chad Eaton says it is the most efficient coal plant in the country, since opening this summer. But, even it would surpass the limit the EPA announced today on the amount of emissions new coal power plants will be able to release.

Jay Leutze was living a quiet life in the Appalachian mountains when he began hearing chain saws and trees falling on the other side of the valley. Jay discovered that a local business man, Paul Brown, was planning to create a massive surface gravel mine on Bellevue Mountain. The facility would blast and crush stone 24 hours a day. A permit had been issued without a single public hearing, a necessary procedural requirement. But Leutze wasn’t sure anything could be done, until he got a call from his 14 year old neighbor. That phone call led him down a five year journey to justice, trying to save the mountain and preserve the landscape for future generations. A conversation about saving a mountain, when Charlotte Talks.

Part One: Old Salem. Just as our country was being forged in the halls of the Continental Congress and birthed in the Revolutionary war, a group of hardy Moravian immigrants was building a settlement in the Piedmont of North Carolina. The town of Salem sprang up and still remains just outside of Winston-Salem. Today it is a living museum, a window into some of the earliest founders of our state. We'’ll visit with the President of Old Salem Inc., a company devoted to the settlement and to educating North Carolinians and other visitors on life in colonial North Carolina. Follow us back in time when Charlotte Talks.