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Duke Energy has agreed to refund $1.3 million to other utilities for overcharges uncovered in a federal audit following its 2012 merger with Progress Energy.

Duke Energy


  With a series of small blasts, workers imploded Boiler No. 1 at Duke Energy’s Sutton plant in Wilmington on Sunday. In a video on Duke Energy’s website, the steel hulk creaks, then crashes to the ground, throwing up a cloud of dust and debris.

Carbon Cycle Energy

Duke Energy has signed a deal to buy natural gas recycled from swine and poultry waste generated at a new plant eastern North Carolina. The contract helps Duke meet state renewable energy rules and could help solve the problem of what to do with the state's growing amount of animal waste. 

NC Department of Environmental Quality

Two public hearings Tuesday will help state regulators decide how and when Duke Energy must deal with coal ash at plants in Belmont and Salisbury. 

David Boraks / WFAE

  The state Coal Ash Management Commission has quietly closed up shop, after Governor Pat McCrory won a battle with lawmakers over its legality. The news comes as the state seeks comments on proposed ratings for Duke Energy’s coal ash sites - something the commission was supposed to oversee.  

Duke CEO Lynn Good
Duke Energy

Beginning a few decades ago, Duke Energy began buying up plants outside the U.S. It also acquired companies beyond the Carolinas that sell energy on the open market. Now, Duke wants to tighten its focus on what it calls its core businesses.

Environmentalists are disappointed over the Supreme Court’s decision Tuesday to put the EPA’s Clean Power Plan on hold. But they say it won’t slow progress in converting the country to a cleaner energy supply. 

David Boraks / WFAE

EDEN - Duke Energy has begun removing coal ash from a half dozen old coal-fired power plants across the Carolinas. One of those was the Dan River plant in Eden, North Carolina, on the Virginia border, where a major spill two years ago prompted new rules for coal ash cleanup and storage.  

Jennifer Lang

The calendar says “January” but some trees and shrubs in the Charlotte area have been saying “March” in recent weeks. The unseasonably-warm December sent some plants into flowering mode. So, what will this mean when March really does roll around?  WFAE's Mark Rumsey spoke with Dr. Jeff Gillman, director of the botanical gardens at UNC Charlotte.

Ben Bradford / WFAE

Draft recommendations from North Carolina regulators would require Duke Energy to eventually remove coal ash from two-thirds of the company’s ash ponds at power plants across the state. That’s about the same number of sites that Duke has already said it’s targeting for ash removal.