Ben Bradford / WFAE

Charlotte’s two candidates for mayor met for a debate Thursday at local PBS station WTVI. The city’s Capital Improvement Plan and the building of a streetcar were the most contentious topics, as they have been throughout the campaign.

Forum Draws Differences Among At-Large Candidates

Oct 30, 2013
T. Ortega Gaines / Charlotte Observer

  A forum featuring eight Charlotte City Council candidates Tuesday found little support for a streetcar, grudging support for business incentives and lingering resentment over the state’s effort to transfer control of the airport.

Eight contenders for four at-large seats met for a forum at WTVI sponsored by the League of Women Voters. Taking part were four Democrats, a Libertarian and three of four Republicans. Republican Vanessa Faura did not attend.

Candidates divided over the streetcar, which advocates see as an east-west connector.

A recent article in the Charlotte Observer had the headline asking, “Voting fight: Is it race or politics?”

For intensely partisan observers, the redistricting fight is either racial or political. But, in looking deeper into the numbers nowadays, the answer is that the voting fight is much more race and politics. 

Going into the future, however, it could be ‘or’ rather than ‘and’ when it comes to racial politics in North Carolina.

Michael Tomsic

A more analytical approach to a massive budget, more input from a neighborhood before closing a school, and a lot more lawmakers in Raleigh who agree with educators in Charlotte.

Those are a few things candidates for the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board called for Thursday night at a public forum hosted by WFAE and MeckEd.

There are 12 candidates running for the Charlotte-Mecklenburg school board’s six district seats.

Courtesy of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

Five CMS district seats are up for grabs this election.  Current board members say they’ve seen the board through difficult financial times and are eager to forge ahead with a new superintendent. Their challengers say there’s room for improvement.  WFAE together with MeckEd will hold a public forum with eleven of the candidates this Thursday evening. The moderator of the event is WFAE’s Lisa Miller. She joins Morning Edition host Kevin Kniestedt for a preview. 

KK:  So one big difference from the last election is we have a different superintendent. 

Charlotte's Mayoral Choice

Oct 22, 2013

Charlotte's next mayor will be either a long-time Democratic city councilman or a some-time Republican councilman with a long pedigree in Charlotte politics.  WFAE has this look at the city's mayoral choice come November 5.

North Carolina leaders have to lay out some of their arguments Monday for how they'll defend the state's sweeping new voting law from court challenges. Monday is the deadline for the state to file a response to lawsuits brought by the North Carolina NAACP and ACLU.

With Washington’s mess garnering the nation’s attention, many voters would like a chance to register their complaints against DC right now. And while they will have to wait until next spring’s primary elections and the general election a year from now, some voters will have their chance to express their votes in the coming weeks.

I say “some” voters because very few voters cast their ballots in odd-year elections, one of which is Charlotte. 

Grant Baldwin Photography

There will be an independent candidate on the ballot for Charlotte City Council’s 4th District this year. The Mecklenburg County Board of Elections yesterday verified activist Michael Zytkow has turned in enough signatures to qualify as an unaffiliated candidate. It’s the first time in at least 15 years that an independent has successfully petitioned his way into the city council race.

Denise Cross Photography

Early voting is underway for Charlotte’s electoral primaries—it ends Saturday at 1:00 p.m. Then, polls open at 6:30 a.m. on Tuesday morning and close at 7:30 p.m. in the evening. Local primaries traditionally have dismal turnout. The Mecklenburg County Board of Elections reports that, through Wednesday, about 3,000 people have taken part in early voting, about double the total in 2011, but still less than a tenth of the number in 2012’s presidential primaries.