Election

In our final chat before Election Day Morning Edition host Marshall Terry talks about last minute campaign strategies, early voting results, and this week’s NAACP lawsuit with political analyst Michael Bitzer.

Medearis Drive neighborhood entrance
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In this strange and difficult election year, sometimes it feels like we live in two countries: one red, one blue. More and more, we choose to live near people who think like us. But not everywhere is like that. There are purple places, too.

Early voting is up 10.7 percent in Mecklenburg County, compared with the last presidential election four years ago.  

As of Wednesday night, the 14th day of early voting, 211,876 people had cast early ballots in the county. That's up from 191,405 after the same number of days in 2012.

Voter registration is up just 4 percent since 2012, according to the Mecklenburg Board of Elections.

As WFAE's Michael Tomsic reported in this story on an NAACP federal lawsuit, a lot of personal information is available through the state Board of Elections website.

"We are to our knowledge, from every state we have checked, we have been the easiest to access information,” says Josh Lawson, the general counsel for the state Board of Elections. “We’re talking about a centralized repository where more than 6.7 million people have addresses listed online."

Nick de la Canal

Each day this week, WFAE has been meeting with voters around Charlotte to get a sense of what really matters to them in this election. Many of the voter's we've heard from so far haven't fallen squarely in the liberal or conservative camp, but express beliefs somewhere in between.

Today, we visit Hornet's Nest Park just off Beatties Ford Rd in north Charlotte. Beneath a canopy of pine trees, a mother and her son are walking slowly, picking things off the ground, and stashing them in a paper grocery bag. Are they picking dandelions? Cleaning up litter?

This election season, we’ve heard a lot about the presidential race, and campaigns for U.S. Senate and governor in North Carolina – and for good reason. We haven't heard much about state legislative races even though the General Assembly has fueled some of the year’s biggest political stories. Think House Bill 2, plus redistricting and changes to voting laws that were struck down in federal court.

Charlotte Observer

For the first time in 16 years, someone different will occupy the state’s attorney general’s office. Former Democratic state Sen. Josh Stein of Wake County and current Republican state Sen. Buck Newton of Wilson are in a close race to succeed Roy Cooper.

Twitter

Economies of scale is a term well known in the business world. It means a way of saving money if you buy in bulk or better use what you already have.

It’s also a factor in politics.

And may be behind all the attention given two campaign messages sent out by conservatives this week about HB 2.

Nick de la Canal

This week, WFAE is taking time to meet with voters in different parts of Charlotte and ask: what matters to you in this election? Responses so far have ranged from "the economy," "the pharmaceutical industry," to a bewildered "I don't know what matters nowadays."

Today, we visit Veteran's Park in east Charlotte, where we meet Seth Keipper, who's sitting on a bench watching his nine-year-old daughter, Alex, on the swings. Yes, he says, he's been following this election.

Nick de la Canal

Each day this week, we're going to different areas in Charlotte and asking voters what matters to them in this election. Today, we're visiting traditionally conservative south Charlotte, also known as "the wedge." That's because if you look at all the Charlotte neighborhoods in the top 10 percent socio-economically, they all roughly fall in the south Charlotte area between Providence Rd. and Park Rd. in the shape of, well, a wedge.

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