Education

Li'l Abner & Education In North Carolina

Jun 26, 2014
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Part 1

Central Piedmont Community College's summer theater season is underway and they are producing a southern favorite, Li'l Abner. Based on the wildly popular Al Capps cartoon Li'l Abner, which ran from the 1930’s for over 40 years, CPCC’s production has an ironic twist. In the title role is newcomer Zach Teague. Over 50 years ago another unknown, Peter Palmer, got the nod as the Broadway star of Li'l Abner. Both actors join us. Palmer, now in his 80’s is still going strong and Mr. Teague is just starting out. We’ll visit with both actors and learn about the production.

Nick de la Canal/WFAE

Third graders in North Carolina who aren’t reading at grade level started summer reading camps this week. It’s part of the new third grade reading law. Last year state officials predicted 60 percent of all third-graders would have to enroll in the camps, but in reality, that number is much lower.


Union County and its school board have tentatively agreed on a budget this year.  That may not seem like a big deal, but last year a budget dispute between the two led to a court battle.  A new local law may have helped them reach consensus faster. 


Governor Pat McCrory, the state House and Senate have significant differences to work out before North Carolina adopts a budget. WFAE's Michael Tomsic looks at three examples of those differences: teacher pay, film incentives and Medicaid.

Lisa Miller / WFAE

Mecklenburg County commissioners are weighing whether to give CMS employees a raise out of the county’s pocket be that by paying the district an extra $26.7 million or asking voters to approve a quarter cent sales tax. A few hundred teachers showed up to a public hearing last night to make their case. 

Mark Hames / Charlotte Observer

Mecklenburg County commissioners are planning for a November referendum on a proposal that would raise the county’s sales tax by a quarter of a penny to pay for salary supplements for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools employees.

Lisa Miller / WFAE

Several superintendents of North Carolina’s largest school districts worry teacher raises may come at the expense of the classroom.  The State Senate has approved a budget that would raise teacher pay on average 11 percent.  But it would pay for that in part by cutting the number of teacher assistants in half.

Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools Superintendent Beverly Emory said at a press conference today losing those assistants could stall the state’s efforts to make sure kids are reading at grade-level. 

Editor B / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

North Carolina is one step closer to doing away with the Common Core.  A House Committee approved the measure yesterday.

The bill’s sponsors worry getting rid of Common Core standards right away would force North Carolina to give back millions in federal grant money. So Representative Bryan Holloway of Stokes County said they chose this route. 

“This bill does replace Common Core, but it does not rip the rug out from under us today,” he said.    

North Carolina teachers would receive an average $5,800 raise next year under the Senate’s plan to boost teacher pay. But there’s a trade-off. Teachers must give up tenure to get the raise and to help fund the raises the number of teaching assistants would be cut in half.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

High school seniors will don caps and gowns at commencement ceremonies in the next few weeks. For many students, this month has been consumed by finals, Advanced Placement exams, and deciding which college to attend in the fall.  But there are also students who are dealing with the added challenges of pregnancy and motherhood.  WFAE’s Nick de la Canal reports on one program that’s helping teen moms in CMS earn their diplomas.


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