Education

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Hundreds of kids across the Carolinas are putting some standardized tests aligned to the Common Core to the test. They’re getting mixed reviews. South Carolina’s School Superintendent wants to prevent the state from using them next year. The jury is still out in North Carolina.


North Carolina’s top education officials now say charter schools must publicly reveal salaries, reversing a March announcement that the independent public schools are exempt from that requirement.

Lisa Miller

In March, a CPCC transgender student was suspended for a day-and-a-half after she used a women’s restroom. She says a security guard told her she needed to use one of the campuses' three gender-neutral bathrooms. The disputed generated a small protest on campus, at which Andraya Williams spoke about the incident.


Lisa Miller

Third graders in North Carolina are on a deadline. They have just a few weeks to prove to the state their reading is up to snuff. Otherwise, they’ll be headed to summer reading camps. There’s a lot to do: lessons to learn, passages to read, and tests to take. It’s all part of the new third-grade reading law. 


Lisa Miller

Charlotte Mecklenburg School officials plan to ask the county for an extra $46 million next year. Most of that would go for a 3 percent pay raise for all CMS employees. 


Courtesy of Belmont Abbey College

Belmont Abbey College is taking a step toward a financial model where tuition alone covers operating expenses.  Belmont Abbey’s President Bill Thierfelder says the college will cut $1 million in administrative costs to get closer to that goal. 

He says right now the college like many others spends too much on departments that tend to function in their own silos. 

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

StudentFirst charter school in West Charlotte is closing its doors next week due to financial problems. That means CMS will have to find room for most of their 260 students to finish out the year and the school district won’t get reimbursed for that expense.

CMS already has mental health therapists in about thirty schools. Another 37 schools will soon be getting them. 


Mecklenburg County commissioners got a crash course Tuesday in how charter schools are funded.  They heard CMS will likely lose more than $80 million dollars to local charter schools next year.  But if CMS no longer has the expense of educating those students, why is that chalked up as a loss for the district? 


Courtesy of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

The Charlotte Mecklenburg School board approved a plan Tuesday night to judge which teachers will be offered bonuses that total $5,000 over four years. CMS teachers will be awarded points for good evaluations, working in a hard-to-fill subject like math, and having an advanced degree and board certification. Growth of student test scores will not be a factor. 

Erika Ellis-Stewart voted for the plan, but said she did so grudgingly.  

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