News and information and education from Charlotte and the Carolinas. 

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE News

The national debate over school safety continues in the wake of tragedies including the fatal shootings of 17 people earlier this month at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.  There are strong calls for stricter gun control measures and a growing debate over the idea of arming teachers and school staffers.   Monday evening, Superintendent Clayton Wilcox and CMPD Chief Kerr Putney will participate in a Facebook Live event to address school safety. 

LISA WORF: What do you think of the idea of arming teachers?

FILE: The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools board of education.
Michael Tomsic

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools board of education vice chair Rhonda Cheek says that the school’s equity report, which found students at high poverty schools and students of color were falling behind, offered more profound insights on absenteeism and gauging high-quality teachers than those two takeaways.

Jessa O'Connor/ WFAE

A Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools report released Friday shows that not all students are receiving the same quality education. It quantified the disparities in terms of school attendance, access to effective teachers and participation in academically rigorous courses.

At 9 a.m. this morning, students at South Mecklenburg High School were allowed 17 minutes to gather outside the school to honor the 17 people killed in last week's shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. 

20 AGs Come Out In Opposition Of Accrediting Agency

Feb 20, 2018
Gage Skidmore

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein joined 19 other Attorneys General in urging the Department of Education and Secretary Betsy DeVos to deny the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools’ petition to regain its status as a nationally-recognized accrediting agency. This joint letter follows the department’s solicitation for written comments regarding ACICS’ request for initial recognition after being denied a renewal in 2016.  

Governor Roy Cooper visited this second grade class at Cotswold Elementary School which would have to make changes to comply with the smaller K-3 class size mandate.
Alex Olgin / WFAE

Governor Roy Cooper was in Charlotte Friday to make his pitch to lawmakers to give schools more money to implement smaller class sizes. He visited with second graders at Cotswold Elementary School. Legislators mandated that elementary schools get kindergarten through third grade classes below 18 students by next school year. While Cooper thinks the idea could improve learning, he said the current plan puts schools in a tough situation because no extra money has been dedicated.

Union County Rep. Craig Horn (standing) talks to CMS officials at legislative breakfast about his efforts to tweak the reduced classroom size legislation for K-3.
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

CMS officials met with the local delegation of state lawmakers Thursday and it was testy at times. The discussion centered on legislation lawmakers approved that would reduce class sizes for students in kindergarten through third grade; and a bill being considered that would allow the towns of Mint Hill and Matthews to use property taxes to run their own charter school.

Duke, UNC Conspired To Not Hire Each Other's Medical Workers, Lawsuit Claims

Jan 2, 2018

The basketball rivalry between Duke University and the University of North Carolina battle is legendary, but a federal lawsuit says the two elite institutions have agreed not to compete in another prestigious area: the market for highly skilled medical workers.

Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

Johnson C. Smith University was placed on probation last week by its accreditation agency. This week that agency released a bit more information about why it made that decision. It cited concerns about the school’s financial stability and control of its resources. But there are still a lot of questions. Smith officials are playing the probation down, saying they expect to clear it up soon. They, too, are not providing any specifics.

Charlotte School of Law entrance
Gwendolyn Glenn / WFAE

The North Carolina Attorney General’s Office says it believes "an administrative error" caused the U.S. Department of Education to deny loan discharges for some former Charlotte School of Law students.