Discovery Place

Drawing shows the concept for a redevelopment of two blocks along North Tryon Street in Charlotte.
Charlotte Mecklenburg Library/DaVinci Development Collaborative

Forces are at work behind the scenes on a series of projects expected to transform the 50-block North Tryon Street area in Uptown Charlotte. Developers, property owners and others involved are offering the public a look at what's to come at a free event Thursday night with food and entertainment.

A January presentation to the City Council envisioned a redesigned facade at Discovery Place on North Tryon Street.
Discovery Place

The Charlotte City Council on Monday approved a $700,000 contract to develop a master plan for the Discovery Place Science Museum.  Jenkins-Peer Architects will study how to modernize and expand the 36-year-old museum on North Tryon Street. 

Briana Duggan

Declining grant money and budget shortfalls plague many of Charlotte's large arts groups. But one big cultural institution is in a different boat from the rest.


Lisa Miller

Gross things have a way of enthralling kids.  A new exhibit at Discovery Place called Animal Grossology tries to leverage that reaction to teach them something about science.  You can learn about vomit munchers, blood slurpers, poop, and smelly stuff. 

Blood suckers, slime makers and vomit munchers. Discovery Place has a summertime exhibit sure to grab your kids . . . and probably make you gag. We go inside "Grossology" on the next Charlotte Talks. But first, we sit down with some people on a mission to make sure the city's museums and cultural institutions – like Discovery Place – have stable financial future. Government grants and workplace giving have declined so dramatically in recent years that Charlotte's arts leaders are sounding the alarm. They've formed a task force to come up with solutions. We talk to the co-chairs of that task force, when Charlotte Talks.

Charlotte’s arts education just got a boost.

PNC Bank has donated more than half a million dollars to fund early arts and science education in the Bethlehem Center’s Head Start programs.

Executive Director of the Bethlehem Center, William McDonald, says that this funding will enrich the program, which serves children whose families meet federal poverty guidelines.