Davidson

Mooresville residents lined up to speak at a Mooresville public hearing June 5 about the mixed-used development.
Town of Mooresville video

Development is booming again in the Lake Norman area. The recession that began in 2008 killed or delayed many projects. But now, new projects are going up from Huntersville to Mooresville. Some residents don't like it - and they're using social media and protests to pressure local officials. Votes are planned this week on two such developments - Monday night in Mooresville and Tuesday night in Davidson. WFAE host Mark Rumsey talked with reporter David Boraks, who has been following the projects.

A worker mows Tim Mascara's lawn on Sloan Street in Davidson. Workers wet the grass and wore protective gear because of concern over asbestos.
Courtesy of Tim Mascara

There was a strange sight in Davidson a few weeks ago – workers in white suits mowing lawns. It’s part of a $3 million asbestos cleanup by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency at about 20 homes and other properties around an old mill.

Workers cut down trees and shrubs then installed a plastic liner, soil and a fiber mat cover on this slope near the former Carolina Asbestos plant in Davidson. Last fall, environmental officials found asbestos running off from the hill.
David Boraks / WFAE

Contractors have finished installing a plastic liner, fresh earth and a fiber mat over an asbestos site at the Metrolina Warehouse near downtown Davidson. Last fall, runoff was discovered flowing from a slope behind the old mill, at 301 Depot St.  in Davidson.

Green "filter socks" are designed to control runoff behind the old Carolina Asbestos plant in Davidson.  The trees will be removed and the hill full of asbestos covered starting next week.
David Boraks / WFAE

Updated Friday, Jan. 27, 2017
Despite the Trump administration's freeze on new Environmental Protection Agency contracts, a federal cleanup of asbestos found at homes in Davidson remains on track. In addition, state officials say work will start next week to cap asbestos that spilled near an old factory in the neighborhood. 

The Metrolina Warehouse in Davidson was an asbestos factory from 1930 to 1960.  A developer wants to tear it down and build apartments.
David Boraks / WFAE

A plan to redevelop an old mill in downtown Davidson has led to the discovery - or re-discovery - of disease-causing asbestos on the site and around the neighborhood. As officials figure out how to clean it up, historical fears and concerns have surfaced as well.

David Boraks / WFAE

Alternative fuel vehicles are showing up more often on the roads these days, as some drivers look for eco-friendly ways to get around. Hybrids and electric cars are fast enough for the highway. But what if you want something simpler? I recently had a chance to test drive an ELF - an electric assisted bicycle made here in North Carolina.

In Huntersville, challenger John Aneralla easily unseated four-term Mayor Jill Swain after an unusually

combative election campaign, winning 59 percent of the vote.  Voters there also added three new members to the six-member Town Board, unseating incumbents Sarah McAulay and Jeff Neely.

Tasnim Shamma

  A teacher at Davidson Elementary school conducted an experiment late last year.  She gave her students exercise balls to sit on, instead of chairs. WFAE paid her classroom a visit then. A year later, it’s no longer an experiment. It’s become a way of sitting at the school, or rather, bouncing. 


Mark Rumsey / WFAE

At first glance, Davidson looks like one of those quaint, picturesque towns fit for a postcard.
So a homeless man sleeping on a bench outside a church immediately stands out.
Look a little closer, and you may realize it’s a sculpture of Jesus. Yes, a Homeless Jesus.
The sculpture has sparked a lot of debate since it was installed a week ago.
It’s also received national and even international attention.

Tasnim Shamma

Take a group of kindergartners and first graders and let them bounce on exercise balls all day instead of asking them to sit still in their chairs.

Sounds crazy, right? Well, it’s happening at Davidson Elementary. 


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