Dan River

Quake Rattles Carolinas, Georgia

Feb 16, 2014

As if a winter storm wasn’t enough last week, a small earthquake near the Georgia-South Carolina line shook both states late Friday, rattling residents hundreds of miles away.  

The U.S. Geological Survey reports a quake of 4.1 magnitude was recorded at 10:23 p.m. There were no immediate reports of injuries or damage. On Saturday, South Carolina DOT engineers were out evaluating bridges – standard procedure after a quake. The quake, about 7 miles from Edgefield, South Carolina, was felt as far west Atlanta and as far north as Hickory, both about 150 miles away.

Duke Energy

While the frightful weather took a lot of attention this week in Charlotte, up north the fallout continued from a coal ash spill into the Dan River. A broken pipe in a Duke Energy ash pond poured over 30,000 tons of coal ash into the river, until crews plugged it a week ago.This week another pipe failed, releasing wastewater; the justice department began investigating the spill; and environmental groups now say they have found another, unrelated leak from the storage pond that holds the coal ash. WFAE’s Ben Bradford joined All Things Considered host Marshall Terry to discuss the latest.


WFAE News staff was busy covering the week's snow and ice storm, so naturally it's a topic of discussion for Greg, Lisa and Brad - er, Ben (listen to the podcast and you'll understand). The trio also discusses the federal investigation of North Carolina's Department of Natural Resources over its reaction to Duke Energy's coal ash spill on the Dan River.


Ben Bradford / WFAE

A revised estimate shows less coal ash than previously thought leaked into the Dan River during a spill last week. Duke Energy now says less than 40,000 tons spilled into the river.

When that stormwater pipe burst ten days ago under a Duke Energy ash pond, the company estimated up to 82,000 tons of ash had spilled into the river, or about 8 percent of the entire pond. Water and ash continued to leak throughout the week as crews worked to plug the pipe. Regulators and Duke promised an updated number once the leak was sealed, which occurred early Saturday morning.

After last week’s coal ash spill, which poured at least tens of thousands of tons of the toxic byproduct of burnt coal into the Dan River, state regulators want to delay their own settlement with Duke Energy over its storage of ash at coal plants across North Carolina.

City Reports 2nd Case Of Illegal Chemical Dumping

Feb 9, 2014

There’s been another incident of illegal dumping into Charlotte’s waste water system. The city said in a statement at 4 o’clock this morning that more of a potentially cancer-causing chemical called PCBs has been found, this time in the Sugar Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, off Tyvola Road.  The illegal dumping is in the wastewater treatment system, and officials say it does NOT affect drinking water.

Duke Energy

Water test results are starting to come in from the part of the Dan River affected by a coal ash spill at a retired Duke Energy plant on the border of North Carolina and Virginia. WFAE’s Duncan McFadyen reports early results are in.


Ben Bradford / WFAE

A broken stormwater pipe from a retired Duke coal plant continues to leak ashy water into the Dan River on the border of North Carolina and Virginia. The pipe broke under an ash pond at the decommissioned Dan River coal plant, about 20 miles from Danville, Virginia. Duke workers are still trying to stem the flow and patch the leak.


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