DACA

The Trump administration announced Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, it would end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, in six months if Congress doesn't find a more permanent solution.

What is DACA?
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, is a program created in 2012 by the Obama administration that allowed young people brought to this country illegally to get a temporary reprieve from deportation and to receive permission to work, study and obtain driver's licenses. DACA applicants had to be younger than 31 when the program began. They also had to prove that they had lived in the United States continuously since June 15, 2007, and that they had arrived before age 16. DACA applicants had to show that they had clean criminal records, were enrolled in high school or college, or served in the military. There are about 800,000 DACA recipients. Learn More.

Full Coverage Below:

Late spring is graduation season for schools across the United States. It's a time of joy and hope for many, but for DACA recipients and their families it can bring added anxiety. For many of these "DREAMers," the threat of deportation looms over their graduation celebrations.

NPR's Scott Simon spoke with Jessica Moreno-Caycho, a DREAMer graduating this May from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Moreno-Caycho said she came with her family to the United States from Peru in 2003. She was 8 years old when she arrived.

With help from his nanny, Poulleth Jimenez, 2-year-old Jack Helton runs a donut shop out of his plastic green and beige playhouse.
Alex Olgin / WFAE

DREAMers, children brought to the United States by their parents and living in the country illegally, are still uncertain about the future of the program that allows them to work and drive, and protects them from deportation.

Zuleyma Castrejon

The future of a program that shields some young immigrants from deportation is uncertain. Last week, a federal judge halted the Trump administration’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, until litigation can be heard. The Department of Justice appealed that case Thursday directly to the U.S. Supreme Court. That comes as Congress debates what to do with the program, which expires in March.

The Justice Department late Thursday announced that it has asked the Supreme Court to overturn a lower court ruling that prevents President Trump from ending the Obama-era program that shields certain young undocumented immigrants from deportation.

That program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, also grants work permits to about 700,000 immigrants brought to this country illegally by their parents.

Jennie Murray / National Immigration Forum

Republican Sen. Thom Tillis spoke candidly before the National Immigration Forum on Thursday, touting his proposal to offer a potential 15-year path to citizenship to so-called "Dreamers," all while shrugging off criticism of the bill from conservative hard-liners.

"This will probably drive my press guy crazy," Tillis said, "But ... when I die, I'm going to be cremated. On my cremation urn or a little plaque next to it, I want to have two or three things -- husband, father, grandfather, RINO."

Erik Erazo says the end of the DACA program threatens all the things that the young people he works with have achieved.

"You see in their eyes the fear, that's the heartbreaker," says Erazo, a high school counselor in Olathe, Kan.

Jose Hernandez-Paris of the Latin American Coalition spoke at a press conference near the Charlotte office of Sen. Thom Tillis Tuesday.
David Boraks / WFAE-FM

President Trump's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA, brought a range of reactions in North Carolina. Congressional Democrats called it a betrayal and cold-hearted. Republicans applauded, though they disagree on how far to go with a law to replace DACA. Immigrant advocates hope for a compromise to help DACA's so-called "dreamers." 

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

With President Trump's announcement on Tuesday that his administration is ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, the White House made clear it wants a legislative solution from Congress to protect the roughly 800,000 "DREAMers," who came to the U.S. illegally as children and now could face the possibility of deportation.

President Trump's decision to rescind an Obama-era policy deferring action against children of undocumented immigrants is drawing scattered protests around the country.

Hours before Attorney General Jeff Sessions made the widely anticipated announcement to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, better known as DACA, hundreds of demonstrators gathered outside the White House. They shouted "We are America" and "We want education. Down with deportation."

America's business leaders are speaking out against President Trump's move to end DACA.

The president of Microsoft, Brad Smith, took a notable stand. He said not only will his company lobby for a legislative solution but also that Microsoft is calling on Congress to make immigration the top priority, before tax reform. And he is calling on other business leaders to follow suit.

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