DACA

The Trump administration announced Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017, it would end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA, in six months if Congress doesn't find a more permanent solution.

What is DACA?
Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, is a program created in 2012 by the Obama administration that allowed young people brought to this country illegally to get a temporary reprieve from deportation and to receive permission to work, study and obtain driver's licenses. DACA applicants had to be younger than 31 when the program began. They also had to prove that they had lived in the United States continuously since June 15, 2007, and that they had arrived before age 16. DACA applicants had to show that they had clean criminal records, were enrolled in high school or college, or served in the military. There are about 800,000 DACA recipients. Learn More.

Full Coverage Below:

Jennie Murray / National Immigration Forum

Republican Sen. Thom Tillis spoke candidly before the National Immigration Forum on Thursday, touting his proposal to offer a potential 15-year path to citizenship to so-called "Dreamers," all while shrugging off criticism of the bill from conservative hard-liners.

"This will probably drive my press guy crazy," Tillis said, "But ... when I die, I'm going to be cremated. On my cremation urn or a little plaque next to it, I want to have two or three things -- husband, father, grandfather, RINO."

Erik Erazo says the end of the DACA program threatens all the things that the young people he works with have achieved.

"You see in their eyes the fear, that's the heartbreaker," says Erazo, a high school counselor in Olathe, Kan.

Jose Hernandez-Paris of the Latin American Coalition spoke at a press conference near the Charlotte office of Sen. Thom Tillis Tuesday.
David Boraks / WFAE-FM

President Trump's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA, brought a range of reactions in North Carolina. Congressional Democrats called it a betrayal and cold-hearted. Republicans applauded, though they disagree on how far to go with a law to replace DACA. Immigrant advocates hope for a compromise to help DACA's so-called "dreamers." 

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

With President Trump's announcement on Tuesday that his administration is ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, the White House made clear it wants a legislative solution from Congress to protect the roughly 800,000 "DREAMers," who came to the U.S. illegally as children and now could face the possibility of deportation.

President Trump's decision to rescind an Obama-era policy deferring action against children of undocumented immigrants is drawing scattered protests around the country.

Hours before Attorney General Jeff Sessions made the widely anticipated announcement to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, better known as DACA, hundreds of demonstrators gathered outside the White House. They shouted "We are America" and "We want education. Down with deportation."

America's business leaders are speaking out against President Trump's move to end DACA.

The president of Microsoft, Brad Smith, took a notable stand. He said not only will his company lobby for a legislative solution but also that Microsoft is calling on Congress to make immigration the top priority, before tax reform. And he is calling on other business leaders to follow suit.

North Carolina General Assembly

Updated 4:54 p.m.
North Carolina Senator Thom Tillis is applauding the Trump administration's decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA. Tillis said Tuesday morning it should be up to Congress to set a long-term policy on the status of immigrants who arrived as children.

Updated at 3:57 p.m. ET

The Trump administration Tuesday formally announced it will end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — also called DACA — putting an expiration date on the legal protections granted to roughly 800,000 people known as "DREAMers," who entered the country illegally as children.

President Trump issued a statement, saying, "I do not favor punishing children, most of whom are now adults, for the actions of their parents. But we must also recognize that we are nation of opportunity because we are a nation of laws."

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Immigrant groups in North Carolina are mobilizing amid reports that President Donald Trump may end the DACA program, while giving Congress six months to come up with a possible replacement.

A Charlotte teenager faces a felony larceny charge - and - possible deportation to his native Mexico. Eighteen-year Gustavo Zamudio is accused of embezzling $2,900 from a Harris Teeter store where he worked. He has a court date on the theft charge on Tuesday.

Zamudio, a senior at Northwest School of the Arts in Charlotte, is currently in federal custody at a detention center in Georgia. The teenager has been protected under DACA -  the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program - designed for immigrants who entered the U.S. illegally as children.

But Zamudio's status under DACA was revoked with his criminal arrest. It used to be that deportation proceedings wouldn't begin until a conviction. Zamudio's case is an example of changing immigration policy under the Trump administration.  

WFAE's Mark Rumsey spoke with one of Zamudio's immigration attorneys. Carnell Johnson says he's seeing more cases similar to Zamudio's. 

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