CMS

Lisa Worf / WFAE

Next Tuesday the CMS board will hold a hearing on the student assignment plan Superintendent Ann Clark unveiled last week. The board has scheduled a vote on it later this month. Over the next couple weeks, we’ll break down how people are digesting the plan. There’s a range of feelings. In some cases, relief, excitement. In others, anger and concern. There are a lot of questions all around about the challenges ahead. 

A man accused of bringing a knife into a west Charlotte charter school was arrested and taken into custody Wednesday morning.

The student assignment proposal is drawing lots of comments from CMS parents. Many of them from the city's south side. Eric Davis, who represents that area, says that's because, under the plan, his district would do the heavy-lifting. Pairing two sets of elementary schools in his district has generated the most comments. He said on WFAE's Charlotte Talks Thursday people are worried about their property values falling and sending their children to schools that now struggle.    

Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools

Nearly half of CMS schools would see changes of some kind, under the proposed student assignment plan the superintendent laid out last night. But most aren't big ones. They involve shifting a neighborhood or two to a school that may be closer, less crowded or allow for a slightly more diverse student body. But there are some more substantive changes, too. WFAE's Lisa Worf discusses the plan with Morning Edition host Marshall Terry. 

75 CMS Schools Will See Change In Ann Clark’s Boundary Plan

Apr 25, 2017
John D. Simmons / Charlotte Observer

Superintendent Ann Clark proposed changes Tuesday at 75 of Charlotte-Mecklenburg’s 170 schools, including new measures such as creating paired elementary schools to increase diversity, breaking up a popular STEM magnet and adding neighborhood zones to what have been full magnet schools.

The number of students affected remained unclear Tuesday night, but neighborhoods across the county will see their elementary, middle and/or high school assignments change if the school board approves Clark’s plan.

Lisa Worf

Those who hope new CMS school boundaries will go a long way to breaking up concentrations of poverty will likely be disappointed Tuesday night. That's when CMS Superintendent Ann Clark releases her recommendations for how to proceed with the district's student assignment plan.   

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Driving a school bus is important work with a lot of responsibility. Drivers have to get students to and from school, safely and on time. The hours are odd, a lot of patience is required and the pay isn't great. All reasons CMS officials often struggle to fill the positions, especially this year.

Ashley Park Elementary is among the schools getting extra resources through the foundation's Project LIFT.
Lisa Worf / WFAE

Thirteen Charlotte elementary schools are hoping to get some of the same flexibility as charter schools. It could be granted under the state’s Restart initiative, an effort to turn around academically struggling schools. CMS board members signed off on the applications but are divided on its merits.

Dr. David Jacobs, a violence prevention specialist at Carolinas HealthCare System, offered crime data at the start of Friday's conference, at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church on Beatties Ford Road.
David Boraks / WFAE

Twenty-seven people have been murdered in Charlotte since the start of the year. That's about double the number a year ago, and mirrors a local and national trend of growth in violent crime. Experts are trying to understand why, and more importantly, what to do about it. WFAE reporter David Boraks was at a conference on Youth Violence Prevention Friday in Charlotte and talked with WFAE’s Lisa Worf.

Last week almost to the day of the one year anniversary of House Bill 2, a children’s book made some news. “Jacob’s New Dress" was initially picked to be a part of first graders' reading selection in Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools.  But it was pulled after a teacher reportedly complained. Superintendent Ann Clark issued a vague statement citing “concerns” about the book.

What those concerns are exactly, depends on who you ask. The book’s main character is Jacob, a young boy who likes to wear dresses. The book explores how he navigates being picked on in school for doing so. Sarah and Ian Hoffman are the coauthors of the book; they live in California. WFAE’s Sarah Delia spoke to them about the decision to remove the book.

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