Update 5:30 p.m.

The first day of opening arguments and testimony is over in the Randall Kerrick trial. The defense and prosecution spent a great deal of the day cross-examining key witnesses.

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Jury selection got underway Monday for Randall "Wes" Kerrick, the former CMPD police officer accused of shooting and killing an unarmed black man nearly two years ago. Kerrick, who is white, shot and killed 24-year-old Jonathan Ferrell when he and two other officers responded to a 911 call. Superior Court Judge Robert Ervin ruled that video cameras, audio recordings, and photography will be allowed during this week's pre-trial motions. Judge Ervin has not determined if they will be allowed during the trial. No video, audio or pictures of jurors will be permitted.

WFAE’s Gwendolyn Glenn was in the courtroom . She spoke to WFAE All Things Considered host Mark Rumsey about the day's events.

Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

Correction Appended

It’s the first day of the trial of former CMPD officer Randall Kerrick. He’s charged with voluntary manslaughter in the 2013 shooting death of Jonathan Ferrell. WFAE's Gwendolyn Glenn tells WFAE's Duncan McFadyen about the judge's decisions Monday morning about what kind of access the media will have to Kerrick’s trial. 

Mecklenburg County Sheriff's Office

Jury selection begins today in the trial of Randall Kerrick, the former CMPD police officer accused of shooting and killing an unarmed black man nearly two years ago. In May, the city settled a lawsuit, filed by the victim’s family, for $2.25 million.

Duncan McFadyen / WFAE

We learned something about new CMPD chief Kerr Putney on Thursday. In an appearance on Charlotte Talks, host Mike Collins asked Putney what attracted him to becoming a police officer.

"Well Mike, nothing. That’s the truth of it. I did not want to be a cop," Putney said.

In fact, Putney says he didn't care for police officers growing up in Roanoke Rapids, NC.

Obviously, that changed. After 23 years on the job, Putney took over as police chief July 1st.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

The trial of Randall Kerrick, the former CMPD Police officer who shot and killed an unarmed black man, begins next week. Police and local community groups have been trying to build relationships hoping to head off any violence. They held one such event Sunday.    

Ben Bradford / WFAE

Charlotte has a new police chief. Long-time CMPD veteran Kerr Putney took the oath of office before the city council Monday.

Jeff Siner / Charlotte Observer

Kerr Putney, a 23-year veteran of Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department will replace Police Chief Rodney Monroe when Monroe retires later this month. Putney is the first internal hire for the position in more than 20 years. His promotion was announced at a press conference at City Hall on Monday.

The deaths of unarmed black men at the hands of police in cities around the country has once again created a national question about how police interact with the minority communities they serve.  In Charlotte, which experienced its own high-profile police killing two years ago, city officials unveiled their answer last night, in the form of a new “civil liberties policy.” It won cautious approval from both police and community groups.

Duncan McFadyen

Retiring CMPD Chief Rodney Monroe met with reporters Tuesday to talk about his decision to step down July 1.

Chief Monroe said he’s been thinking about retiring for several months, but he made the final decision over the weekend. He says being police chief is a tough job that takes a lot of energy.