CMPD

kerr putney
Charlotte Observer

Throughout the week, pressure had been mounting on CMPD to release video of the fatal shooting Keith Scott. Now, there’s a new call that was heard Saturday night in non-violent protests uptown: Release all the video.

Early Saturday evening, CMPD released dashcam and body camera footage of the shooting. The footage included moments immediately before and after the shooting - and leaves a lot of questions unanswered.

On Friday afternoon, WFAE aired an hour long special discussing the video released by Keith Scott's wife, Rakeyia Scott.

Joining Mark Rumsey were WFAE reporters Tom Bullock and Gwendolyn Glenn and Charlotte School of Law professor Jason Huber. Included in the special were interviews with former Charlotte police chief Darrel Stephens, Charlotte city councilwoman Vi Lyles, and Stephen N. Xenakis, M.D. Brigadier General (Ret), retired general and Army psychiatrist.

Michael Tomsic / WFAE

Updated Friday, 4:30 a.m.
The family of Keith Scott wants the public to see videos of Scott being shot and killed by police Tuesday.  Members of the Scott family viewed dash-cam and body camera videos of the shooting Thursday. 

The family's lawyers issued a statement afterward, saying the videos raise more questions than answers. They say it’s impossible to tell from the videos, "what, if anything," Scott was holding when officer Brentley Vinson shot him in an apartment complex near UNC Charlotte.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

Wednesday night’s protests in uptown Charlotte over a fatal police shooting began with a peaceful rally at Trade and Tryon streets. But then the crowd went in different directions: Some wound up listening to speeches of unity at an uptown church as others confronted police.

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
David Boraks / WFAE

There was another side to Wednesday night. Although the clashes uptown were eye-catching, the overwhelming majority of protesters were not violent. We're going to hear a conversation with a few of them. Bria O'Neal, Khiana Ralph and Leah Wright are young African-American women who live in Charlotte and came to the protests together. WFAE's Michael Tomsic asked them why. 

Protests in Charlotte Sept. 21, 2016
Tom Bullock / WFAE

This latest round of protests started peacefully. "It was all cool," said 31-year-old Eddie Thomas, "until riot cops came out. And once the riot cops came out, within five minutes, you had a man on the ground bleeding."

In northeast Charlotte Tuesday, a Charlotte Mecklenburg police officer shot and killed a black man. That prompted a night of angry protests. Police say they’re still investigating but here’s what we know:

Officers went to an apartment complex off Old Concord Road to serve an arrest warrant. They saw 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott sitting in a parked car. Police say he got out of the car with a gun, and that’s when officer Brentley Vinson, also an African-American, fired.

Charlotte Mecklenburg police chief Kerr Putney has given more details about a fatal police shooting Tuesday and his department’s response to protests later in northeast Charlotte.

Over the past year, the CMPD and data researchers with the University of Chicago have taken part in an ambitious experiment. Can an algorithm help stop police misconduct before the incident takes place?

In part 1 of our series, we reported on the differences between the algorithm, known as random forest, and the current Early Intervention System used by the CMPD.

In part 2, we look at the results of this experiment.

Michael Tomsic

Charlotte City Council members approved new body armor and more community training for CMPD last night. They also got updates on the streetcar, the airport and the NBA All-Star game. We’ll get to those in a minute. But first, the votes involving CMPD and the frustration many at the meeting expressed about police treatment of African-Americans.

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