Civil Rights

Local News
3:55 pm
Fri February 8, 2013

Former Charlotte Mayor Gantt's Civil Rights Victory Featured In New Film

Harvey Gantt smiles for reporters on Jan. 23, 1968 - the day he became the first African American to enroll at Clemson University in South Carolina.
Credit Cecil Williams via scetv.org

Charlotte newcomers may recognize the name "Gantt" because it's on the Center for African Arts and Culture Uptown. They may even know Harvey Gantt was the city's first African American mayor. But the name carries even more weight in South Carolina, where Gantt had a major role in desegregation. That is the subject of a new documentary airing this weekend on ETV – the South Carolina public television station.  WFAE's Julie Rose explains:

Read more
Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Thu February 7, 2013

Taylor Branch On Civil Rights

Pulitzer-Prize winning author Taylor Branch's most famous body of work is his trilogy chronicling the history of the American Civil Rights Movement and the life of Dr. Martin Luther King. His most recent work distills the trilogy into a smaller volume that is meant to be used by history teachers to help educate students about this defining period in our nation's history. We'll talk with Mr. Branch about the Civil Rights era and what led him to write so extensively about it, about race today, and more, when Charlotte Talks.

Read more
Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Mon January 21, 2013

Church Integration And Martin Luther King (Rebroadcast)

  Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once wrote "worship at its best is a social experience with people of all levels" His vision for more integrated churches has not truly come to fruition but several area religious leaders hope to change that. We'll meet a Sociologist studying the divisive nature that can pervade churches in our region as well as two Pastors working to diversify their own congregations. On the week of the celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. we look at his hope for integration of the church experience in America.

Read more
Charlotte Talks
12:00 am
Fri January 18, 2013

Kids And Race

Martin Luther King, Jr. said "I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character." There is evidence that children form attitudes and opinions about race as early as six months old. In a recent study by our guest Dr. Melanie Killen (commissioned by CNN), a white child and a black child look at the exact same picture of two students on the playground and see very different things. How do children interpret our differences and form racial attitudes? We'll find out how to talk to kids about race with a researcher into children's social development and the author of a children's book about race.

Read more

Pages