Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools

Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools expects to have 5,000 third-graders qualify for reading camps this summer as a result of the state's new third grade reading requirement. District officials worry state money won't come close to covering the cost of these camps.  They’re asking the state for flexibility on the camps, as well as all the tests that come with the new third grade reading law. 

Teachers did not get a raise this year, but state lawmakers have set aside bonuses for the top 25 percent of teachers next year.  It’s up to school districts to figure out who those teachers are -- and that’s no easy task. 

CMS fourth and eighth graders are performing about the same in math and reading as they were two years ago, according to the National Assessment of Education Progress.  The tests have been given to a sample of students across the country since 2003.  At a time when state tests are drastically changing, these scores provide a way to compare student performance from year to year. 

Michael Tomsic

The Charlotte Mecklenburg School board will soon have two new people with the last name of Bailey. Matthews Mayor Pro-Tem Paul Bailey swept district six, which covers southern Mecklenburg county, receiving 60 percent of the vote.  He said voters wanted someone who is a good collaborator. 

Students Tag And Release Monarch Butterflies

Oct 14, 2013
Tasnim Shamma

Kindergarten and fourth-grade students at Barringer Academic Center in Charlotte spent the last few months learning about the life cycle and migration patterns of the Monarch butterfly.

The Monarch is well known for its bright orange and black wings, but also for its annual migration from Mexico to Canada – and back – every year.


Many school systems are wrestling with ways to serve students with mobile technology such as tablets. But Guilford County Schools has learned there’s a downside to the devices. The district has suspended its tablet program after students reported 1,500 cracked or broken screens in just the first month of school. 

Mecklenburg County voters will decide in November if the county will issue $290 million in bonds to fund academic programs, construction, renovations and upgrades for Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools. Superintendent Morrison says that CMS has real and urgent needs that the 2013 bond issue would address. And there are other issues at hand like the master’s pay cut-off, the new reading requirements for third graders and the reevaluation of standardized testing. Join us for a conversation with Superintendent Morrison.

Atty. General Says He'll Challenge Gov. McCrory

Oct 6, 2013

North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper told Democratic Party activists Saturday he’ll run for governor in three years.  Appearing Saturday at the Democrats’ Western Gala in Asheville, Cooper said it's too early to make a formal announcement, but he’s ready to challenge first-term Republican Governor Pat McCrory.

Closing the Achievement Gap for children in schools is a goal that's proven tough to achieve across the country over a period of several years, but it's one that educators, parents and lawmakers continue to try to make happen. North Carolina passed legislation in 2012 that may help. The Read to Achieve program works to ensure that every student in the state is reading at or above grade level by the end of third grade. In this special edition of Charlotte Talks, we're working with the YMCA, MeckEd and Teach For America to bring together leaders from four of the major school systems in our region. We'll discuss literacy, the problems in bridging the Achievement Gap in school and find out what gains the Read to Achieve program may make towards the goal of improving literacy in North Carolina, when Charlotte Talks. This show was recorded on Thursday night July 25th at Friendship Missionary Baptist Church.

Michael Tomsic

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools will cut back the hours its teacher assistants work this year. That's one of several examples Superintendent Heath Morrison gave of how the state budget that passed Wednesday will impact the district.

The budget agreement state House and Senate leaders reached this week cuts funding for teacher assistants by about one-fifth ($120 million) this year.

CMS Superintendent Heath Morrison said that will hurt students.