Charlotte Mayor Election

Mayor Jennifer Roberts speaks at a debate Thursday at Reeder Memorial Baptist Church with challengers Joel Ford and Vi Lyles.
David Boraks / WFAE

At a debate in northwest Charlotte Thursday night, the city's three Democratic mayoral candidates faced an audition of sorts - for an endorsement by the Black Political Caucus of Charlotte-Mecklenburg. Filing isn’t even open yet for the Sept. 12 primary. But the group plans to make an unusual early endorsement in the coming days.

Nick de la Canal / WFAE

Charlotte's Democratic mayoral candidates Joel Ford, Vi Lyles, and Jennifer Roberts participated in a forum Saturday afternoon that focused heavily on police-community relations and the city's role in responding to police shootings.

Several progressive and Democratic groups have organized the first candidate forum of Charlotte's upcoming mayoral race. The forum will feature all three of the Democratic candidates who've announced plans to run.

North Carolina State Senator Joel Ford is officially tossing his hat into the race for Charlotte mayor.

"It's time for new leadership and a bold vision for our city," Ford said in a campaign-produced video released Wednesday, "We need a mayor who will focus on the issues that unite our city, not divide it."

Today, at Little Rock AME Church in uptown, Vi Lyles announced that she is running for Charlotte’s mayor. Elections for that post and city council seats take place later this year.

WFAE/Sarah Delia

Charlotte is less than two weeks away from electing a new mayor. Democratic candidate Jennifer Roberts and Republican Edwin Peacock face off at the polls November 3rd.

Roberts is the favorite. After all, Charlotte’s electorate is heavily Democratic. Which is why Edwin Peacock’s campaign is focused on winning over unaffiliated voters. WFAE’s Sarah Delia reports.


Marshall Terry / WFAE News

If you’re a music fan, chances are you’ve seen the work of Charlotte photographer Daniel Coston.  His
photos have been published in Rolling Stone, Time – you name it.

Charlotte Mecklenburg Library has not had an easy three years.  Mecklenburg County cut a big chunk of its budget.  In response, the library drastically cut hours.  But now library CEO Lee Keesler says things are moving in the right direction.  

What a difference three years makes.  Back then, library board meetings were somber affairs.  But at yesterday’s meeting, the mood was light.  There were even some jokes.