Charlotte Douglas International Airport

A more than $100 million project to speed shipments from Charlotte to East Coast sea ports has begun operation. The intermodal facility is an “inland port” that allows transfer of shipments between bus, train, and airplane. The 200-acre site at the airport is still under construction, but Charlotte aviation director Brent Cagle says it sent out its first shipment Monday by train.

“That’s a soft opening,” Cagle says. “They will continue to increase operations at the facility over the next four months until the facility is at full operations.”

Airline Merger Creates Few Immediate Changes At CLT

Dec 9, 2013
Mark Harkin / Flickr

US Airways and American Airlines officially merged Monday to create the world’s largest airline. Charlotte’s airport, a current US Airways hub, will become the second-busiest in the new airline’s network but customers and employees are not expected to see immediate changes.


Governor Pat McCrory said Monday he supports the Charlotte City Council position in the fight with state lawmakers over control of Charlotte Douglas Airport—including the city’s removal of former aviation director Jerry Orr from his long-time post. Until now, McCrory has shied away from taking a public stance on the issue.

At the end of an hour-long interview on WFAE’s Charlotte Talks, host Mike Collins asked McCrory the question.

Ben Bradford / WFAE

When you look out the airplane window as you fly into Charlotte, the trees thin, the Uptown skyline rises into view, and the buildings of West Charlotte grow larger, as your plane drops altitude. The City of Charlotte hopes to add solar panels glinting across the airport’s parking lots and in-between the runways to that view. The city is soliciting bids for an ambitious solar project at the airport.

Nicola since 1972 / Flickr

Charlotte's airport will remain a major hub for U.S. Airways for at least three years after the company merges with American Airlines. That's part of a settlement the airlines reached with the Justice Department and state attorneys general today, which had sued to block the merger.


TSA Shifts Exit Lane Security To Airport

Nov 10, 2013
Julie Rose

The Transportation Security Administration says it will no longer staff passenger exits at Charlotte Douglas International Airport come January. 

To plug the security gap, interim aviation director Brent Cagle says Charlotte will spend close to half a million dollars paying contract workers from the private firm G4S to man the exits for nine months. During that time, Charlotte officials will explore permanent options – including the possibility of technology to secure the exits. 

Ben Bradford / WFAE

The Charlotte airport commission—which the city wants to disband—met for the first time last night, in the city council's own quarters. Commissioners met to figure out what, if any, role they have while a court battle stalls their takeover of Charlotte Douglas Airport.  After four hours of deliberation, the 13-member commission decided to put its lawyers on a short leash, but stopped short of firing their executive director.


usairways.com

Go ahead and keep that tablet or e-reader on during your next US Airways flight.

Beginning today, the airline that operates more than 90 percent of flights out of Charlotte Douglas International will allow use of portable electronic devices from start to finish on flights.  Cell phone calls will not be allowed in flight, but customers will no longer be chided by flight attendants to turn off and stow small devices.  Anything weighing over two pounds will still need to go overhead or under the seat during takeoff and landing. 

Julie Rose

  Still more punting going on in the fight for control of Charlotte Douglas International Airport: A Superior Court judge today refused to weigh-in on questions posed by federal regulators about the nature of the commission lawmakers created to run the airport. 

As Judge Robert Ervin put it in court today: Why does the Federal Aviation Administration care what "some fool judge" thinks? "Because there's nothing to keep the FAA from looking at any declaration this court makes and saying, 'So what?'"  

Judge To Hear More Airport Arguments Friday

Oct 31, 2013

"The nature of the beast" is the question for Judge Robert Ervin, who will hear arguments about Charlotte Douglas International Airport Friday in a Mecklenburg County courtroom.


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