Charlotte City Council

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Charlotte City Council last night was expected to cast a symbolic vote on whether to repeal recently-passed LGBT protections. Council approved those protections in February as part of an expansion of the city’s non-discrimination ordinance, but they were rendered moot by House Bill 2.

A symbolic repeal was portrayed as a way forward, a sign of good faith which would spur North Carolina’s Republican-dominated legislature to modify House Bill 2.

But the vote was pulled from the council agenda at the last minute. End of story, right? Not even close.

Charlotte Council Removes HB 2 From Agenda

May 23, 2016

The economic impact of HB 2 was put on tonight's city council agenda early this afternoon. The topic was taken off the agenda about four hours later. The city issued the following statement at about 4:40 p.m.

Elon University

Over the weekend, the economic impact of House Bill 2 was at the heart of two very different calls to action. One voice called for Charlotte’s City Council to blink and repeal the LGBT ordinance passed earlier this year. The other called on North Carolinians to stand and fight House Bill 2.

  Supporters and opponents of House Bill 2 both rallied near the legislature Monday, as lawmakers returned for the new session. And as they returned, four Democratic representatives introduced a bill to repeal the controversial law.

North Carolina General Assembly

 State Senate Leader Phil Berger says he doesn’t envision any changes to House Bill 2 during the short session that begins Monday, including one revision requested by Gov. Pat McCrory. He also said he’ll push for a 2 percent state budget increase, including another round of teacher raises. 

Diedra Laird / Charlotte Observer

Two weeks ago,  PayPal announced Charlotte would be home to a new global operations center. On Tuesday, the company canceled those expansion plans. The reason: House Bill 2, which the legislature passed and the governor signed March 23.  

Julie Rose / WFAE

For the last three years, Ron Carlee has served as Charlotte’s City Manager, responsible for running the day to day operations of the 16th largest city in America. Carlee’s contract expires in March. Carlee announced Wednesday night that he won't seek a new contract, although it's unclear if he would have been offered one.


Tom Bullock / WFAE

It was a crucial vote about one of the region’s most congested roadways. The Charlotte City Council voted twice Monday night to support toll lanes around the region. And specifically the project on I-77 North now under construction. That vote was 7 to 4. This despite many council members accusing State officials of issuing financial threats if they didn’t approve the project.

The transportation committee of the Charlotte City Council voted Monday to continue support of controversial toll lanes planned for I-77, I-485 and U-S 74.  The full council is scheduled to take up the issue later this month.

Gwendolyn Glenn/WFAE

Crime is a fact of life and so is the reality that some neighborhoods will have more of it than others. But that doesn’t mean residents in high-crime areas are complacent. In Charlotte, many are pushing city officials to aggressively tackle crime in their communities. One idea that’s gotten a lot of attention calls for designated zones in high-crime areas that would ban people from those communities when they commit a crime there.

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