Catawba River

File photo. / WFAE

Budgets are supposed to be focused on taxes and spending. But the North Carolina Senate has a reputation for sliding major policy changes into its spending plan. This year is no exception. It contains a plan for a major overhaul to a key water quality regulation. 

Nick de la Canal

For as far back as 2,000 BC, mothers in the Catawba Indian tribe have been using special techniques to craft unique pieces of hand-made pottery, passing down its traditional methods from generation to generation.

The tradition nearly died out a century ago, when the tribe’s population fell to just over 100 people. But over the last several decades, the Catawba people have reestablished themselves on a reservation near Rock Hill, South Carolina, right off the Catawba river, and that’s led to a revival of the tribe’s pottery-making.

Drought Causes Low Water Levels Along The Catawba

Sep 1, 2015
David Boraks

Visitors to Lake Norman and Lake Wylie may have noticed a lot more bare earth peaking out from the edges of the lakes. Lake Norman and Lake Wylie have dipped two to three feet below their typical levels for this time of year, due to drought.

http://www.catawbariverkeeper.org/

A longtime voice in the effort to protect and improve the Catawba River basin is stepping down. Rick Gaskins, the executive director of the Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation, leaves in June. Gaskins is a Charlotte attorney who started as a volunteer with the group shortly after it formed in 1998. Gaskins remembers spending his summers as a child, playing in creeks. Today, he has a more complex understanding of the Charlotte region's system of rivers and lakes.


Riverkeepers

Aug 8, 2014
D&S McSpadden / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

North Carolina is a diverse state. With mountains, piedmont plains, lowland marsh and shoreline, the state has just about every kind of geography one can imagine. One common thread of all of this diversity is water. North Carolina has a huge network of streams, rivers and lakes. Water is important to the state but it's also a focal point for politics and power. Today, we meet three riverkeepers from different parts of the state to find out if the politics of water is the same everywhere or if each riverkeeper has  unique set of challenges and goals. 


-ted / Flickr

Almost two million people in the Carolinas rely on the Catawba River, or the Wateree River, which it becomes in South Carolina. This week, the region’s water utilities released what they call the most significant plan for the Catawba’s water supply since reservoirs were built in the early 1900s.


Community Battles Flood Waters In Cramerton

Jul 29, 2013
Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

The worst flooding in 40 years sent water from the South Fork Catawba River to the edge of homes and businesses in the Gaston County town of Cramerton early Monday, but a a community-wide sandbagging effort by volunteers appeared to prevent serious damage.

  Water levels began dropping around sunrise, but authorities say they expect the river to remain above flood level for the rest of the day.

File photo. / WFAE

The Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation works to protect the Catawba-Wateree River Basin's lakes, streams and rivers. The Foundation says that 1.7 million people in our region depend on the Catawba River. The Catawba has been labeled as “endangered” by multiple organizations in recent years, and in the past, we've discussed the reasons for that endangerment. Today, we'll check in with the Catawba Riverkeeper to find out the current state of the Catawba River, and about many of the issues the Catawba Riverkeeper Foundation is following, including water levels in the area due to all the rain we've been having, long term water quantity, and much more, when Charlotte Talks.

Duke Energy

A recently shuttered coal plant sits on the Catawba River in Gaston County, and state environmental officials say it’s seeping heavy metals precariously close to Charlotte’s water supply. This week, the N.C. Division of Water Quality added that coal plant to a lawsuit against Duke Energy—the plant’s owner. The state has had evidence of violations for two years, but declined to act until recently.


Emergency Officials Warn Residents On Catawba River About Rising Water

May 7, 2013
Davie Hinshaw / Charlotte Observer

  Residents along the Catawba River should remain vigilant through tonight for rising waters caused by this week’s heavy rains, Duke Energy and emergency management officials warned.

A road in Charlotte was blocked Tuesday and firefighters were going door-to-door warning people about flooding along the Catawba River.

Water flowed downstream after mountain counties received heavy rainfall Monday. Some areas of the mountains got as much as seven inches of rain. Charlotte received 1.6 inches of rain, breaking a precipitation record.