Camp LeJeune

Local News
10:46 am
Tue April 28, 2015

Marines On A Pronunciation Mission: Camp Lejeune Is Camp Luh-JERN

The Lejeune family took out a billboard near Camp Lejeune to gently ask Marines to pronounce the name "luh-JERN"
Credit Nat Fahy

Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, North Carolina is one of the country’s largest Marine bases. But the man it’s named for, Lieutenant General John Archer Lejeune, pronounced his name "luh-JERN," differently from how most people say it now ---"luh-JUNE".

So there’s been a push to revive the “correct” pronunciation of the name. Camp Lejeune Public Affairs Director Nat Fahy says Gen. Lejeune revived the Marine Corps’ war-fighting doctrine by developing its amphibious mission, which proved instrumental in World War II.

The Marine base named in his honor opened in 1941, and Fahy says the pronunciation was correct for while. From his research, the "luh-JUNE" pronunciation caught on in the Vietnam era.

But now, thanks in part to the education efforts of the Lejeune family and a dedicated group of veterans, Fahy says he’s seeing a change. He spoke to WFAE host Duncan McFadyen.


Local News
10:34 am
Tue June 24, 2014

Fast-tracked, Bipartisan NC Bill Pushes Water Lawsuits Forward

Water flows from a kitchen faucet.
Credit Jenn Durfey / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

A new North Carolina law could allow two water contamination lawsuits to go forward, after they were stymied by a U.S. Supreme Court decision earlier this month.


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Local News
5:06 pm
Mon July 1, 2013

Sequester Extinguishes July 4th Fireworks At Camp Lejeune, Fort Bragg

Sky Flowers from Camp Lejeune's Independence Day celebration in 2009. The Marine Corps base will not host a fireworks celebration this year because of budget cuts.
Credit Louis Shackleton/Flickr

  It'll be a less explosive Fourth of July celebration at military bases in North Carolina this year. Two of the state's major military bases are cancelling fireworks due to budget cuts.

Fort Bragg has had a fireworks display for more than 30 years. It does them big and it does them loud.

More than 50,000 people from Fort Bragg and Fayetteville show up for the celebrations. The U.S. military lost more than 10 percent of its budget this year because of federal budget cuts and the policy known as sequestration. Fort Bragg spokesman Tom McCollum says it's unfortunate.

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