Kenneth Carr: Back Home For The Sunset Jazz Festival

Sep 12, 2014

It’s been eight years since Charlotte-born jazz musician Kenneth "Kenny" Carr last played before a home crowd.

Not familiar with Carr?

Well, let’s start there.

“Charlotte has a lot of great musicians,” Carr said during a phone chat from his home in West New York, N.J. “However, Charlotte is the type of city where they actually grab other artists from someplace else.

“I can go to Europe, I can go to Budapest, I can go all over the world and people love and embrace me,” he continued. “But you go to Charlotte, you can barely get played on the radio.”

The stories of violins recovered from the Holocaust and the people who played them are the focus of an event this evening at UNC Charlotte. Music professor James Grymes will read from his book, “Violins of Hope.” He was inspired to write the book two years ago when the violins were part of an exhibit on campus.  That exhibit marked the first time the violins were on display in the U.S. His research included a visit to the Israeli violinmaker who restored the violins.

North Davidson, or NoDa, is known as Charlotte’s arts district – but that reputation might not be deserved anymore. A lot has changed in the last decade. So where is Charlotte’s local arts scene going? Contributor Greg Lacour reports.

Wall Poems of Charlotte

If paint can bring energy to an old wall, can an art group bring new energy to a corporate building?

A new space uptown aims to do both. The story begins a year ago with a bit of a mystery.

Going Door-to-Door For Laughs

Apr 14, 2014

So, you want to make it in showbiz. Your plan would more than likely look something like this: Move to Hollywood, work a string of odd jobs, and become familiar with rejection.

In this story, Krista Cassidy looks at how a Charlotte comedy duo are trying to make it big from their hometown.

Rachel Woodhouse and Justin Smith are always taking their show on the road. It’s called Door-to-Door. This week’s stop is an unassuming business park in South Charlotte that’s serving as a set.

Courtesy: Ruth Lyons

Today, Charlotte’s NoDa neighborhood is known as a creative hub where artists go to live, work and play.

But in the 70s and early 80s, the area was known for its vacant textile mills. The future looked grim.

Then, a new vision started to emerge when a young artist couple arrived 30 years ago and showed what’s possible. WFAE’s Kim Watson Brooks has their story.

Briana Duggan

Throughout January, a Brazilian artist will create a structure made out of Charlotte's trash. The work will be on display at the Projective Eye Gallery at UNC Charlotte’s Center City building. WFAE's Briana Duggan rode along with the artist as he hunted for materials and found that gaining access to these things that no one wants – is more difficult you would think.

Briana Duggan

In 1940s New York City there was a group of young idealistic photographers that called themselves the New York Photo League. They took to the streets to document the city’s inequality with the hope of changing it. Photos from the League are now on display at the Mint Museum Randolph through June 29.

Photographs taken by Charlotte resident Sonia Handelman Meyer are the focus of the exhibit, but the real story is how they got there.

Charlotte Duo's Electronic Music Gets Recognition

Nov 27, 2013
Alexia Gyorody / WFAE

Technology is always evolving and spurring something new. Music is one example. Go to a trendy nightclub uptown, and it’s there’s a good chance you’ll hear electronic dance music. WFAE’s Alexia Gyorody gives us a glimpse into electronic dance music through this profile of two Charlotte artists known as StylesNComplete.

Craig Elmore / WFAE

This past Saturday the Studio Movie Grill at the Epicenter threw a party for the locals who appeared in the movie Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa.  The hit film stars Johnny Knoxville as Irving Zisman, an 86-year-old man who takes his 8-year-old grandson to North Carolina to see his father.  This is the latest film in the Jackass series, all of which use hidden cameras to play pranks on real people. Much of Bad Grandpa was filmed in the Charlotte area.