budget

Berger
North Carolina General Assembly

Hoping it will help jump start negotiations on North Carolina’s budget, state senators are offering major concessions to the House. But they want something in return. 

For weeks now senior budget writers from both the House and Senate have been talking, just not about the numbers in their budgets.

"We have had discussion on the economic development proposals and the Medicaid proposals," said Senate President Pro-Tem Phil Berger.

  "I think we are....," Berger then took a long pause before finishing,"closer than we have ever been in getting those things worked out."

LizMarie_AK / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

There are two dates that loom large for parents, teachers, students and administrators in Charlotte-Mecklenburg. The first is August 14, the self-imposed deadline for the General Assembly to agree on a state budget. The second, just 10 days later, is the first day of school.

Without a set budget, schools have a hard time planning for the academic year and they may have to start cutting programs now just in case. As for the budget negotiations, they're not going so well. At least not yet.

Teacher assistants have been a big point of contention between the North Carolina House and Senate as they work on a budget. But another difference came to light this week. The Senate budget would end state-funded health benefits for new state employees when they retire. 

www.ncleg.gov

    

The North Carolina Senate and House are both dominated by Republicans. But they’re Republicans with big ideological differences in regards to tax incentives, spending, and Medicaid to name a few. As in past years, their education budgets also layout different priorities.      

WFAE’s Lisa Worf joins Morning Edition host Marshall Terry to look at what those priorities are.

NC House Passes $22 Billion Budget

May 22, 2015
North Carolina General Assembly building.
NC General Assembly

Early Friday morning, North Carolina’s House of Representatives passed its $22 billion state budget. The final vote came just after 1 am. It capped off more than 9 hours of debate about the bill itself and nearly 50 amendments to the measure.

charmeck.org

Charlotte’s City Council appears no closer to a consensus on how to fill a hole in the city’s budget deeper than in any year of the recession. City Manager Ron Carlee has proposed a complex mix of expense cuts and fee increases. But a key part of his plan hinges on raising property taxes while lowering a garbage fee that homeowners pay—it’s a complex scheme that hasn’t gained traction with the city council. The council once again debated that and other parts of Carlee’s plan Monday for more than an hour without obvious progress. Mayor Dan Clodfelter called a halt.

Charlotte Tosses Out 'Pay-As-You-Throw' Trash

May 5, 2015
WasteZero

Charlotte City Manager Ron Carlee Monday night recommended raising property taxes as part of his plan to make up for a large city budget gap. Carlee told City Council the bump of almost 2 cents per $100 of property value would bring in enough revenue to cover the cost of Charlotte’s residential trash service. So what does that mean for the “pay-as-you-throw” trash plan under deliberation last year? 


Jimmy Wayne / Flickr

Union County no longer has to pay its school system $91 million. In 2013, that’s what a jury said the county owed the district for years of under funding. The North Carolina Court of Appeals Tuesday granted a new trial. 


Flickr/Seth Sawyers / http://www.flickr.com/photos/sidewalk_flying/4267034867/sizes/l/

The budget state lawmakers settled on last week looked like it would preserve teacher assistant positions.  But it’s not true, according to some school districts.  Teacher assistants may still be cut.   

Senate President Pro-Tem Phil Berger praised the budget last week for giving teachers raises and not making cuts to the classroom. 

News Director Greg Collard and reporters Ben Bradford and Tom Bullock (sitting in for Lisa Miller) discuss how lawmakers finally reached a budget deal. They also discuss the myriad of disputes that have dragged out and kept Tom and Ben up late at night, even prompting one of them to turn a WFAE studio into a bedroom of sorts.

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