budget

Tanner Latham / WFAE

Mecklenburg County commissioners have made it clear they don't want to put school bonds before voters this fall. Still, CMS Superintendent Ann Clark is making the case to do that, but with a dose of reality. She's meeting with commissioners Tuesday afternoon to talk budgets. 

  "In some ways, I hope we get to a win-win solution. That may not be a bond in 2016, but is a commitment on the part of the county to begin addressing some of these capital needs," says Clark.

Charlotte Observer File

Some county commissioners are floating an idea of giving CMS a specific percentage of the county’s budget each year.

The governor signing the North Carolina budget into law, as McCrory did on Friday, usually signals the end the state legislative session. But North Carolina’s House and Senate are back in session this week.

Public Domain

Lawmakers in Raleigh have unveiled a bill which would greatly increase the money the state can use to lure companies to relocate or expand in North Carolina.

For much of this year Governor Pat McCrory has been asking lawmakers to increase these tax incentives. The House agreed, the Senate balked.

Now the two chambers have compromised.

North Carolina's budget deal is heading to Governor Pat McCrory's desk, and McCrory says he'll sign it. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Marshall Terry to go over some of the details.

Lisa Worf / WFAE News

This summer, North Carolina senators pushed a plan to cut thousands of teacher assistants. Educators from across the state rallied against the idea.  And in the budget compromise unveiled this week, lawmakers decided to keep funding for teacher assistants. But there’s a catch; and it’s one that many educators say is problematic.

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The North Carolina Senate has given its tentative approval for the state’s budget. Tuesday's vote was along party lines, 33-16. But the debate didn’t focus on money.

North Carolina General Assembly

Hoping it will help jump start negotiations on North Carolina’s budget, state senators are offering major concessions to the House. But they want something in return. 

For weeks now senior budget writers from both the House and Senate have been talking, just not about the numbers in their budgets.

"We have had discussion on the economic development proposals and the Medicaid proposals," said Senate President Pro-Tem Phil Berger.

  "I think we are....," Berger then took a long pause before finishing,"closer than we have ever been in getting those things worked out."

LizMarie_AK / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

There are two dates that loom large for parents, teachers, students and administrators in Charlotte-Mecklenburg. The first is August 14, the self-imposed deadline for the General Assembly to agree on a state budget. The second, just 10 days later, is the first day of school.

Without a set budget, schools have a hard time planning for the academic year and they may have to start cutting programs now just in case. As for the budget negotiations, they're not going so well. At least not yet.

Teacher assistants have been a big point of contention between the North Carolina House and Senate as they work on a budget. But another difference came to light this week. The Senate budget would end state-funded health benefits for new state employees when they retire. 

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