budget

North Carolina Republicans have taken the first step to cancel Gov. Roy Cooper's veto of the state budget.

The state Senate voted 34-14 Tuesday to override the governor's veto of the two-year spending plan approved by the legislature last week. The margin was well over the three-fifths majority required in the state constitution. Only a similar House vote stands in the way of the budget becoming law.

As Expected, Cooper To Veto Budget

Jun 26, 2017

Gov. Roy Cooper says he will veto the state budget put on his desk by Republican lawmakers.

Cooper made the announcement Monday, four days after the GOP-controlled legislature gave final approval to its two-year spending plan. Republicans are likely to override the veto because of substantial House and Senate majorities. Cooper calls the budget “small-minded.”

Jenna Eason / Charlotte Observer

Mecklenburg County Manager Dena Diorio has proposed a budget for 2018 that includes no property tax increases. It recommends a $15 million increase for CMS, but that's about $12 million short of the $440 million the district requested. 

“This will support the costs of opening new facilities, cost increases for health and retirement benefits, sustaining operations, and a portion of the request to expand student support services, including guidance counselors and social workers," says Diorio. 

Tanner Latham / WFAE

Mecklenburg County commissioners have made it clear they don't want to put school bonds before voters this fall. Still, CMS Superintendent Ann Clark is making the case to do that, but with a dose of reality. She's meeting with commissioners Tuesday afternoon to talk budgets. 

  "In some ways, I hope we get to a win-win solution. That may not be a bond in 2016, but is a commitment on the part of the county to begin addressing some of these capital needs," says Clark.

Charlotte Observer File

Some county commissioners are floating an idea of giving CMS a specific percentage of the county’s budget each year.

The governor signing the North Carolina budget into law, as McCrory did on Friday, usually signals the end the state legislative session. But North Carolina’s House and Senate are back in session this week.

Public Domain

Lawmakers in Raleigh have unveiled a bill which would greatly increase the money the state can use to lure companies to relocate or expand in North Carolina.

For much of this year Governor Pat McCrory has been asking lawmakers to increase these tax incentives. The House agreed, the Senate balked.

Now the two chambers have compromised.

North Carolina's budget deal is heading to Governor Pat McCrory's desk, and McCrory says he'll sign it. WFAE's Michael Tomsic joined Marshall Terry to go over some of the details.

Lisa Worf / WFAE

This summer, North Carolina senators pushed a plan to cut thousands of teacher assistants. Educators from across the state rallied against the idea.  And in the budget compromise unveiled this week, lawmakers decided to keep funding for teacher assistants. But there’s a catch; and it’s one that many educators say is problematic.

Public Domain

The North Carolina Senate has given its tentative approval for the state’s budget. Tuesday's vote was along party lines, 33-16. But the debate didn’t focus on money.

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