Brooklyn Village

Ben Bradford

County Commissioners chose BK Partners to redevelop Brooklyn Village, a one-time economically diverse, African-American community that was razed as part of the 1960s urban renewal movement. After Wednesday’s vote, many questions lingered for some commissioners about the $683 million project.

Ben Bradford

Tom Hanchett is thought of as Charlotte’s historian, but his actual title is staff historian for the Levine Museum of the New South in uptown Charlotte. Since 1999, he’s witnessed, documented and told Charlotte’s story for the museum. Hanchett recently announced that he’ll be giving up his full-time post.  That doesn’t mean he’ll stop working though.   

Courtesy of J Murrey Atkins Library / UNC Charlotte

Long before Charlotte had its crown of skyscrapers, rings of highways and cape of sprawling suburbs, there were two trails that crossed each other in a relatively flat section of piedmont.

The path that went east-to-west would eventually be called Trade Street – fitting since it originally connected two rivers.

The North-South trail would turn into what we now know as Tryon Street. And that trail was part of the key path for settlers, a path then known as The Great Wagon Road. 

Today, we begin a new series, Along The Great Wagon Road: Occasional Detours Through History.

Our first detour takes us to the corner of 7th and Hawthorne in Charlotte’s Elizabeth neighborhood. And the life of a man who fought bigotry with a biting sense of humor.

The Once And (Potential) Future Brooklyn, Charlotte

Mar 24, 2014
Ben Bradford / WFAE

For much of the 20th century, the southeastern quadrant of Uptown Charlotte contained a bustling neighborhood known as Brooklyn. It formed because of segregation, but grew into the center of Charlotte’s black community.  Torn down and paved over, a vibrant Second Ward became a sleepy government district. But city leaders plan to revive the area through a new development that bears a familiar name, if they can get it off the ground.