Asheville

bundt cake on a plate
Courtesy of OWL Bakery

And now for something sweet on the eve of the 2016 Election. It’s an issue everyone can support no matter who you’re voting for: the power of desserts. Two bakers in Asheville have resurrected a tasty treat from the 1700’s known as Election cake. WFAE’s Sarah Delia spoke with the bakers who are out to “Make America Cake Again.”

Duke Energy

 State regulators have delivered another blow to environmentalists trying to block a new power plant in Asheville.  The North Carolina Utilities Commission says two groups must post a $98 million bond before they can appeal.

That's nearly 10 times the amount regulators originally set for an appeal by environmental groups NC WARN and The Climate Times. The commission says the bond is needed to pay Duke Energy's costs if the project is delayed.

Sarah Delia WFAE

The City of Asheville goes by another name, Altamont. That's how it appeared in a book by early twentieth century writer Thomas Wolfe.  He called the place home, but not in an especially fond way. His novel Look Homeward Angel about a young writer trying to break free of his small town and family was largely autobiographical and brought him literary acclaim. A new film which takes place in New York, called Genius, portrays Wolfe and his working relationship with his editor. As Jude Law got ready to fill Wolfe's literary shoes, it wasn't the big city he had to go to fully understand the writer, it was Asheville, and one place in particular there. 

Duke Energy

State regulators will hold a hearing June 17 to help determine whether environmentalists should have to pay a multimillion dollar appeal bond before they challenge approval of a Duke Energy power plant in Asheville. 

Two environmental groups have asked the state Court of Appeals to remove a major financial hurdle in their fight to halt Duke Energy's plans for a new gas-fired power plant in Asheville.

Remembering Max and Rosie's

Oct 7, 2014
David Spadden / Flickr

I lived in Asheville in the early 2000s, about the same time Rolling Stone named it the “New Freak Capital of the U.S.” There were a lot of freaks back then, with train-hoppers and burnouts sleeping in Pritchard Park and the highest population of dreadlocked didgeridoo players east of Sydney. There were also tourists, especially in fall when hoards of leaf peepers arrived, but most of the year you were more likely to see panhandling gutter punks than Pomeranians in handbags. Not anymore. Even though Asheville’s reputation as weird persists, it’s not really where Dead Heads go to die these days; it’s where yuppies go to eat.

Get ready for a week of college basketball in Charlotte: The city is hosting the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association men’s and women’s tournaments for the ninth year. Games begin Tuesday at Time Warner Cable Arena. Livingstone and Bowie State have the top seeds in the men’s tournament, while Fayetteville State and Virginia State top the women’s side. Charlotte’s Johnson C. Smith University’s men’s and women’s teams both have Number 5 seeds. The tournament annually brings thousands of fans and players to town for a week of games and parties.

1/25 Stryker Brigade Combat Team/Flickr

The Police Evidence Room in Asheville is the subject of an intense public records battle. More than a year ago, a partial audit revealed guns, drugs, and cash were missing. The police chief resigned.

Another, more thorough audit has been completed. But the district attorney won’t release its findings. He says it’s part of an ongoing SBI investigation.

A coalition of media groups sued for the audit’s release, and last week, a judge sided with the DA.

Jon Elliston is covering the dispute for the investigative website Carolina Public Press, which is a plaintiff in the lawsuit. He spoke to Duncan McFadyen