Arts & Life

Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Rocks Versus The Rock In 'San Andreas'

Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson in San Andreas.
Jasin Boland Warner Bros.

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 6:50 pm

In the Universal Pictures release Earthquake, one of the biggest hits (no pun intended) of 1974, The Big One takes a big bite out of Los Angeles — God's vengeance, the film implies, for Charlton Heston cheating on Ava Gardner with Genevieve Bujold.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

'Aloha' Brings A Muddled Romance To Hawaii

Bradley Cooper and Emma Stone in Aloha.
Neal Preston Columbia Pictures

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 7:58 pm

It's hard to tell what, exactly, Bradley Cooper's deal is in the imperfect yet oddly compelling tropical dramedy Aloha. His character, Brian Gilcrest, is a military contractor assigned to oversee a ceremony in Hawaii that will allow his employer to launch a new satellite of dubious motives. That part's easy enough. After his role in the megahit American Sniper, it's intriguing to see Cooper playing what amounts to a cynical, bizarro-world version of Chris Kyle.

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Movie Interviews
2:36 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

David Oyelowo On Acting, His Royal Roots And The One Role He Won't Take

David Oyelowo plays an American Army veteran living with his mother in HBO's Nightingale.
HBO

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 10:06 am

If actor David Oyelowo projects a regal air, it's one he comes by naturally. Born in England to Nigerian parents, Oyelowo's father had always told him that theirs was a royal family, a claim the actor initially discounted.

"I was like, 'Yeah, whatever,' " Oyelowo tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. But then the family moved back to Nigeria, where they lived on a street named after his family, and the actor realized that his father had not been joking.

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Code Switch
12:23 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

Not Your Mother's Catholic Frescoes: Radiant Portraits Of Queer People Of Color

Photographer Gabriel Garcia Roman's "Queer Icons" series portrays queer people of color as saints and warriors. Jahmal Golden is a poet and a student at The New School.
Courtesy of Gabriel Garcia Roman

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 4:54 pm

Photographer Gabriel Garcia Roman's portraits feature friends and acquaintances, activists and poets, Americans and immigrants — some naturalized, some undocumented.

All of them are queer people of color.

"I wanted to specifically focus on this community because queer and trans people of color are so rarely represented in the art world," says Roman, who is Mexican-American and also identifies as queer.

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The Two-Way
12:19 pm
Thu May 28, 2015

'Trigger Mortis': New Bond Novel Brings Back Pussy Galore

A return to Pussy Galore's golden days: Honor Blackman, who played the character on screen in Goldfinger, poses with the original Bond, Sean Connery.
Express/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 5:37 pm

What kind of birthday gift do you get a man who has everything? It's a well-worn riddle — and one that gets all the more difficult if the man in question happens to have died a half-century ago.

Luckily for Ian Fleming, today's 107-year-old birthday boy and the creator of James Bond, novelist Anthony Horowitz knows just the gift: a reunion with an old friend.

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Code Switch
9:00 am
Thu May 28, 2015

The Worst Kind Of Groundhog Day: Let's Talk (Again) About Diversity In Publishing

This summer brings many excellent books from writers of color.
Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 11:57 am

Another day, another all-white list of recommended reading. This year's New York Times summer reading list, compiled annually by Times literary critic Janet Maslin, offered up zero books by non-white authors.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu May 28, 2015

'The Water Knife' Cuts Deep

Ariel Zambelich NPR

Originally published on Thu May 28, 2015 3:29 pm

In The Windup Girl, Paolo Bacigalupi's best-selling, Hugo- and Nebula-winning debut, the author imagines a 23rd century in which the forces of commerce have run amok over the basic, biological building blocks of life. In his equally powerful sophomore novel, The Water Knife, he takes a similar approach to an inorganic substance without which human life wouldn't exist: H2O. But where The Windup Girl takes place hundreds of years from now in Southeast Asia, The Water Knife hits closer to home for U.S. readers.

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Music Articles
5:17 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Ornette Coleman Sues Over 'New Vocabulary'

Saxophonist and composer Ornette Coleman.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 1:09 pm

Updated below at 6:40 p.m. ET with defendants' response.

Was it a laudable snapshot of cross-generational jamming, or taking advantage of a jazz titan?

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Ask Me Another
4:53 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

The Best Piece of Trivia You Learned This Week: Teary Edition

What's the best piece of trivia you learned this week? Share it with us on Facebook or Twitter, and we'll figure out whether it's true or false.

True or false: in outer space, tears stick to your eyeballs, effectively blinding you if you can't wipe them off.

Heard in Veep of the Rings

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Ask Me Another
4:48 pm
Wed May 27, 2015

Veep's Anna Chlumsky On Youth, Television And Tolkien

Actress Anna Chlumsky attends the Los Angeles premiere for the second season of HBO's series 'Veep' at Paramount Studios.
Angela Weiss Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 27, 2015 5:22 pm

After a successful career as a child actress, starring in films such as My Girl and Trading Mom, Anna Chlumsky walked away from the big screen and went back to school. But while working as an editorial assistant at HarperCollins, she began feeling an itch. "There was a month where I was really open to [the question] 'what should I do with my life?'" Chlumsky told Ophira Eisenberg at The Bell House in Brooklyn. "And I'd get signs from the universe."

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