Arts & Life

Pop Culture
5:46 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

Bond Fans Shaken Over Switch From Martini To Beer

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 4:18 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Finally this hour, we raise a glass to this man.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (as James Bond) Bond, James Bond.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And we probably don't need to tell you what's in the glass.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: (as James Bond) Vodka martini, shaken, not stirred.

(as character) One medium dry vodka martini, mixed like you said, sir, and not stirred.

(as James Bond) A medium dry martini, lemon peel, shaken, not stirred.

(as character) Vodka?

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Pop Culture
5:37 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

Read All About It: Superman's Alter Ego Quits Job

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 4:18 am

Transcript

UNIDENTIFIED MAN 1: Look, up in the sky. It's a bird. It's a plane. It's Superman.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Superman may be faster than a speeding bullet and more powerful than a locomotive, but starting tomorrow, he'll no longer do battle with deadlines, at least print deadlines.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Movies
2:35 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

Bollywood's 'King Of Romance' Took India To The Alps

Yash Raj Chopra, shown celebrating his 80th birthday earlier this year in Mumbai, died Sunday.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 1:42 pm

My parents were among the millions of South Asian couples who fell in love to the music and words of Yash Chopra's films. Sweeping, operatic and often absurdly melodramatic, the director's Bollywood musicals were shamelessly populist and hopelessly romantic. They were India's romantic comedies, its adult dramas and its crowd-pleasing blockbusters all rolled into one.

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Asia
1:57 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

Cambodia Vs. Sotheby's In A Battle Over Antiquities

The United States and Cambodia are locked in a legal battle with the auction house Sotheby's over this 1,000-year-old statue of the Hindu warrior Duryodhana that may have been looted from the Cambodian temple complex at Koh Ker.
Courtesy of the U.S. Attorney's Office

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 4:18 am

The governments of Cambodia and the United States are locked in a legal battle with the auction house Sotheby's over a thousand-year-old statue. The two governments say the statue was looted from a temple of the ancient Khmer empire. Sotheby's says this can't be proved, and a court in New York will decide on the matter soon.

The case could affect how collectors and museums acquire artifacts, and how governments recover lost national treasures.

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Charlotte Music
10:36 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Before Nashville, There Was Charlotte

Old 78 records.
Olivander/Flickr

Before Nashville became the country music capital of the country, Charlotte was a major center for early country and blues artists to record. Record companies looking for new sounds outside the big cities of the north came to Charlotte several times between the late '20s and '40s in search of “hillbilly” and “race” music as it was called back then.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Comic Struggles Of A Frustrated Writer In 'Zoo Time'

Courtesy of Bloomsbury

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 11:01 am

"My aim," writes English novelist Guy Ableman to his agent, "is to write a transgressive novel that explores the limits of the morally permissible in our times."

Sounds quite serious, even brow-wrinkling, doesn't it? A dangerous act of experimental writing, perhaps something Norman Mailer might have tried, or Henry Miller before him?

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Author Interviews
4:38 am
Tue October 23, 2012

Running Toward Redemption On 'Ransom Road'

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 5:53 am

Meet a man with a powerful addiction — to running. Caleb Daniloff says he believes the sport saved him from addictions that were far worse, and he's written a new book, called Running Ransom Road: Confronting the Past, One Marathon at a Time, about his experiences.

Daniloff has run some familiar marathons — New York and Boston — but he's also been to a place not famous for outdoor running: Moscow.

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Books News & Features
4:38 am
Tue October 23, 2012

America's Facebook Generation Is Reading Strong

Pew's study found that 60 percent of Americans under 30 used the library in the past year.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 5:53 am

In what may come as a pleasant surprise to people who fear the Facebook generation has given up on reading — or, at least, reading anything longer than 140 characters — a new report from the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project reveals the prominent role of books, libraries and technology in the lives of young readers, ages 16 to 29. Kathryn Zickuhr, the study's main author, joins NPR's David Greene to discuss the results.

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How We Watch What We Watch
4:37 am
Tue October 23, 2012

The Afterlife Of A TV Episode: It's Complicated

Despite having aired its final episode in May, the medical drama House lives on, in reruns and on digital services like Hulu, Netflix and Amazon Prime. But not every episode is available in all formats.
Adam Taylor AP

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 8:43 am

Have you ever seen a rerun episode that made you want to watch more of a show — even a whole season? With so many TV channels and so many shows to keep up with, it's possible that some of them could completely pass you by.

But there are also many ways to watch a show, even if it's no longer on the air. Take the medical drama House, which ended its run on FOX in May.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:00 pm
Mon October 22, 2012

'Nixon In China': An American Opera Inches Toward Classic At 25

The original production of John Adams' Nixon in China (at Houston Grand Opera) celebrates the 25-year mark.
Jim Caldwell Houston Grand Opera

Twenty-five years ago today, Houston Grand Opera mounted the world premiere of Nixon in China, the first opera by a young composer named John Adams. Two days later, The New York Times described it as a "coy and insubstantial work" and "hardly a strong candidate for the standard repertory."

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