Arts & Life

Monkey See
11:08 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Ten Clues That The Zombie Outbreak Being Announced On Your Television Is Not A Hoax

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 2:25 pm

As reported on Tuesday's Morning Edition, KRTV in Great Falls, Mont., was apparently the victim of hackers who broke in and broadcast a warning of attacking zombies. The station now says that it was a hoax, fortunately.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Book News: Anger Over 'Superman' Author Who Condemns Homosexuality

An image from the cover of the first issue of Superman.
DC Comics AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 10:06 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue February 12, 2013

'Vampires' Isn't Sparkly — It's Magnificent

There's a popular misconception that literary fiction is supposed to be staid, boring, realistic to a fault. Like all stereotypes, it's deeply unfair, but it endures, perhaps because readers keep having traumatic flashbacks to novels, like Sister Carrie, that they were forced to read in high school.

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First Reads
7:03 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Exclusive First Read: 'With Or Without You' By Domenica Ruta

Spiegel & Grau

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 1:05 pm

Domenica Ruta's memoir, With or Without You, chronicles her youth in a working-class Massachusetts town, the daughter of a wildly flamboyant mother who drove a beat-up lime green hatchback, and held impromptu storm-watching parties on the porch.

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Poetry
3:38 am
Tue February 12, 2013

In A North Vietnamese Prison, Sharing Poems With 'Taps On The Walls'

Horst Faas Associated Press

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 9:12 am

The United States was fresh off signing the peace accords to end the long and bloody war in Vietnam when, on Feb. 12, 1973, more than 140 American prisoners of war were set free.

Among the men to start a long journey back home that day was John Borling.

An Air Force fighter pilot, Borling was shot down on his 97th mission over Vietnam on the night of June 1, 1966. He spent the next six years and eight months in a notorious North Vietnamese prison.

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Food
3:37 am
Tue February 12, 2013

An Italian-Inspired Valentine's Feast From 'Nigellissima'

If you can't find pennette, use the small bulging crescents that are chifferi, or regular elbow macaroni, instead.
Courtesy Random House

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 1:51 pm

Before the roses and the romance, Valentine's Day commemorated the Roman Saint Valentine — Valentinus, in Latin. And in her new cookbook, Nigellissima: Easy Italian-Inspired Recipes, chef Nigella Lawson offers up simple recipes that celebrate the cuisine of the country Saint Valentine called home.

Lawson joins NPR's Renee Montagne to share some recipes for a romantic dinner for two, and describes the time she spent in Italy.

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The Salt
6:22 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Less Potent Maker's Mark Not Going Down Smoothly In Kentucky

With too little distilled bourbon to meet demand, Maker's Mark is lowering the product's alcohol content from 90 to 84 proof.
Ed Reinke AP

Originally published on Mon February 11, 2013 7:58 pm

Kentucky is bourbon country. Bar shelves in Louisville are stocked with a crowded field of premium bourbons; the city's Theater Square Marketplace restaurant alone carries close to 170 different brands. So when news trickled out that longtime distillery Maker's Mark plans to water down its bourbon, locals were stunned.

Bourbon has to be aged at least two years — and that's where Maker's Mark got in trouble. Chief Operating Officer Rob Samuels says the company simply didn't make enough.

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A Blog Supreme
5:24 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Remembering Donald Byrd, Jazz Trumpeter Who Spanned Generations

Donald Byrd onstage, in an image circulated by his record label at the time, Blue Note Records.
Echoes/Redferns Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 6, 2013 11:23 am

The trumpeter and educator Donald Byrd, a top jazz practitioner in the '50s and '60s whose later work shaped black pop music through multiple generations, died Feb. 4 in Dover, Del. Haley Funeral Directors near Detroit confirmed the news, which was first circulated online last week. He was 80.

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Technology
4:11 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Video Game Violence: Why Do We Like It, And What's It Doing To Us?

A typical scene from Call of Duty: Black Ops 2, the latest in the series of wildly popular video games.
Activision

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 9:57 am

Violent video games have been a small part of the national conversation about gun violence in recent weeks. The big question: Does violence in games make people more violent in the real world?

The answer is unclear, but one thing is obvious: Violence sells games. The most popular video game franchise is Call of Duty, a war game where killing is the goal.

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Author Interviews
2:33 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

An 'Autopsy' Of Detroit Finds Resilience In A Struggling City

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and Detroit native Charlie LeDuff says that the city must forget the future and instead focus on the present. His new book is called Detroit: An American Autopsy.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Tue February 12, 2013 10:36 am

For some, Detroit may be a symbol of urban decay; but to Charlie LeDuff, it's home. LeDuff, a veteran print and TV journalist who spent 12 years at The New York Times, where he shared a Pulitzer Prize in 2001, returned home to the city after the birth of his daughter left him and his wife — also a Detroit native — wanting to be closer to family.

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