Arts & Life

Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed January 2, 2013

New History Puts Cartographers' Art 'On The Map'

Originally published on Wed January 2, 2013 12:13 pm

The fight for mapping supremacy between two tech giants blew up this fall when Apple, in revising its mobile operating system, dumped the Google Maps app overboard. To Google's delight, no doubt, Apple's own maps app wobbled badly out of the gate, and amid a consumer outcry, a public apology and quiet firings, all of us caught a glimpse of just how high the stakes are in today's mapping game.

Read more
Book Reviews
4:24 pm
Tue January 1, 2013

A Story Of Slavery, Loss And Hope In 1850s Ohio

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 2:19 pm

In the aftermath of the Compromise of 1850, a controversial bill that included the Fugitive Slave Act, the journey to freedom became increasingly difficult for enslaved people. In Tracy Chevalier's newest novel, Ohio and its intricate network of Underground Railroad activity provides a rich background for this period.

Read more
Monkey See
4:16 pm
Tue January 1, 2013

Home Video Review: 'Looper'

Joe (Bruce Willis) fights a younger version of himself in Looper.
Alan Markfield Sony Pictures

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 2:19 pm

Welcome to a future when time travel has been outlawed, meaning only outlaws like Joe, played by Joseph Gordon-Levitt, travel through time. Joe's an assassin for a crime syndicate that sends folks it wants erased back from 30 years hence.

Gordon-Levitt's been made up to look like a young Bruce Willis, and when Willis shows up as one of the folks he's supposed to kill — well, that's called closing the loop — and there you have director Rian Johnson's nifty premise.

Read more
Europe
4:16 pm
Tue January 1, 2013

'One Pound Fish': A Pakistani Man's Passport To Fame

Pakistanis welcome Muhammad Shahid Nazir, center, the singer of "One Pound Fish," at Lahore's airport Thursday.
Hamza Ali AP

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 2:19 pm

There's a new Internet video that might give the Web sensation "Gangnam Style" a run for its money. It's for a song called "One Pound Fish," and its unlikely star is a 31-year-old Pakistani man who until recently was a fishmonger in London's Upton Park.

Read more
The Record
12:03 pm
Tue January 1, 2013

Hearing A Mother's Song After Tragedy

Natalie Maines performing in April.
Jonathan Leibson WireImage

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 1:39 pm

I first heard Natalie Maines's version of "Mother," the Pink Floyd song, while sitting alone in my car on a particularly difficult Saturday morning. It was the day after Adam Lanza took his mother's guns into Sandy Hook elementary school and wreaked destruction, and like many people across America, I'd spent most of the previous day trying to grasp what had happened. I really mean grasp: like so many tragedies that don't involve me directly yet engross me as they unfold in raw, real time on the Web, this one quickly became a spectral burden that was difficult to shake.

Read more
Monkey See
9:55 am
Tue January 1, 2013

2012 In Review: 50 Wonderful Things From The Year In Pop Culture

Don Draper (Jon Hamm) and Peggy Olson (Elisabeth Moss) in the pivotal Mad Men episode, "The Other Woman."
AMC

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 10:08 am

Read more
The Salt
9:03 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Drinks, Diets And Meat: Hits Of 2012, Predictions For 2013

Some of The Salt's most popular posts of 2012 included coffee, pink slime and Downton Abbey.
Daniel Acker/Landov; Carnival Film & Television Limited 2011/Masterpiece; Adam Cole/NPR; Robyn Mackenzie/iStockphoto.com; Lass/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 4, 2013 8:19 am

As the new year begins, we here at The Salt are looking back at the food topics that got you talking in 2012, and pondering which conversations will continue in 2013. (And, like many of you, we're also firmly swearing off the holiday cookies.) So, instead, feast your eyes on this roundup of our top stories from the past 12 months:

Read more
Southword
3:04 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Coming Home — And Out — In The South

Chad Griffin, president of the Human Rights Campaign, based in Washington, D.C.
Dave Anderson Oxford American magazine

Originally published on Thu January 31, 2013 5:17 pm

Many years ago, a young Chad Griffin left his hometown of Arkadelphia, Ark., to pursue a career in politics. Today, he's the newest head of the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) — a powerful gay rights group based in Washington, D.C.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
2:49 am
Tue January 1, 2013

Was 2012 The Year That American Orchestras Hit The Wall?

In Minneapolis, the locked-out musicians of the Minnesota Orchestra are appealing for public support.
Courtesy of the Musicians of the Minnesota Orchestra

Originally published on Tue January 1, 2013 9:44 am

2012 will go down as a year of orchestral turmoil in the U.S.: Strikes, lockouts and bankruptcies erupted time and again as once seemingly untouchable institutions struggled financially.

There's been particularly little seasonal cheer in Minnesota's orchestral community. Protests erupted after management at the Minnesota Orchestra and the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra each locked out their musicians, after the musicians had rejected contracts that cut their salaries by tens of thousands of dollars and reduced the size of the orchestras.

Read more
Monkey See
4:21 pm
Mon December 31, 2012

Bob Mondello's Best Movies Of 2012

Cousin Ben (Jason Schwartzman), Sam (Jared Gilman) and Suzy (Kara Hayward) show that nothing can stand in the way of young love in Wes Anderson's Moonrise Kingdom.
Niko Tavernise Focus Features

Originally published on Wed February 20, 2013 12:41 pm

A lot of movie box-office records fell in 2012. The comic-book blockbuster The Avengers had the biggest opening weekend in Hollywood history. Skyfall will be the first James Bond film to top $1 billion worldwide. And the box-office year as a whole is easily the movie industry's biggest ever. But what about quality? Perhaps surprisingly, the news is good there, too.

Read more

Pages