Arts & Life

Movie Interviews
3:45 am
Thu October 4, 2012

Bond Gadgets Stand Test Of Time (But Not Physics)

A scene from 1973's Live and Let Die features Jane Seymour and Roger Moore. In the film, Moore wears a supermagnetic wristwatch said to deflect bullets at long range.
United Artists and Danjaq, LLC AP

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 10:19 am

James Bond — the film franchise, that is — is turning 50. But if 007 is getting up there in years, his gadgets will never get old.

Throughout the series, the creators have always come up with wild gear for Bond to bring along on his missions — while often taking a lot more creative license than they might have needed. They've come up with pieces that were inventive and prescient at best, impossible in the real world at worst, as astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson tells NPR's David Greene.

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Movies
3:43 am
Thu October 4, 2012

From Tim Burton, Another Signature Lovable Loner

After his best friend and beloved dog dies, Victor Frankenstein (Charlie Tahan) decides to harness the power of mad science to bring Sparky back to life — albeit a little the worse for wear.
Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 10:19 am

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The Salt
5:40 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Capturing Summer's Harvest, One DIY Wine Bottle At A Time

Customers at a Hartford produce market, choosing grapes to turn into homemade wine.
Jeff Cohen NPR

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 6:40 pm

If buying a local wine just isn't local enough for you, then you might consider joining the growing ranks of people making homemade wine this fall.

Some home winemakers make wine with friends for fun, some make wine with family for tradition; some make it "old school," adding nothing, and drink it by Christmas; others do it "new school," adding preservatives, and wait a year or more to bottle.

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The Record
5:24 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Welcome To Jay-Z's Brooklyn

Jay-Z plays the first of eight concerts at Brooklyn's Barclays Center on Friday, Sept. 28.
New York Daily News Archive NY Daily News via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 2:25 pm

Last Friday two things changed. The shifts weren't seismic, or unexpected, but now Brooklyn is different and hip-hop is different. It's because of Jay-Z, who, despite owning only 0.067% of the Nets and less than 0.2% of the Barclays Center, has become the public face of Brooklyn – not the team, the town.

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Theater
5:16 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Racial Issues, Far From 'Invisible' On D.C. Stage

Teagle F. Bougere plays the titular Invisible Man in The Studio Theatre's adaptation of Ralph Ellison's novel.
Astrid Riecken The Studio Theatre

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 6:40 pm

On a farm in Waitsfield, Vt., in 1945, a Merchant Marine cook named Ralph Ellison was resting after his tour of duty.

"One morning scribbling, I wrote the first sentence of what later became The Invisible Man: 'I am an invisible man,' " Ellison recalled in an interview for National Educational Television.

He wrote that his protagonist — a Negro, as Ellison always put it — was young, powerless and ambitious for the role of leadership, a role at which he was doomed to fail.

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Author Interviews
2:39 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Tobolowsky: An Actor's Life 'Low On The Totem Pole'

The Tobolowsky Files." href="/post/tobolowsky-actors-life-low-totem-pole" class="noexit lightbox">
Stephen Tobolowsky is an actor and writer. He also hosts the podcast The Tobolowsky Files.
Jim Britt Courtesy of Simon & Schuster

Originally published on Tue October 9, 2012 10:37 am

If you saw Stephen Tobolowsky on the street, you might think you know him from somewhere. The character actor has appeared in over 100 films and TV shows, with recurring roles in Heroes, Deadwood, Glee and now The Mindy Project.

In his memoir, The Dangerous Animals Club, Toboloswky charts the highs and lows of life as a character actor. Some of his roles have been so small, he says, his characters didn't even have names — as, for example, with his turn as "Buttcrack Plumber."

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Commentary
1:28 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

When Words Were Worth Fighting Over

In 1961, the publication of Merriam-Webster's Third International Dictionary sparked an uproar with its inclusion of the word "ain't."
Flickr User Greeblie

Originally published on Wed October 3, 2012 3:10 pm

I have a quibble with the title of David Skinner's new book, The Story of Ain't. In fact, that pariah contraction plays only a supporting role in the story. The book is really an account of one of the oddest episodes in American cultural history, the brouhaha over the appearance of Merriam-Webster's Third International Dictionary in 1961.

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Television
12:02 pm
Wed October 3, 2012

Holmes Carves African-American Spot In Late Night

T.J. Holmes has spent more than a decade in journalism, but now he's turning his sights to late night with a new show called Don't Sleep! The show began broadcasting on BET this week. Holmes sits down with host Michel Martin to discuss his career and hope to bring a fresh perspective to late night talk.

You Must Read This
11:36 am
Wed October 3, 2012

Depression-Era Evil: Horror In A Haunted Land

Originally published on Tue January 8, 2013 2:19 pm

Julia Keller's latest novel is A Killing in the Hills.

When the actor James O'Neill played the title character in a stage version of The Count of Monte Cristo, it was a piece of "good bad luck," his son Eugene O'Neill later said. James O'Neill could never escape the shadow of the role that made him famous.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Wed October 3, 2012

Page And Screen Make Peace In 'Mr. Penumbra'

Farrar, Straus and Giroux

It's been five years since the Amazon Kindle started one of the most enduring literary controversies of recent times: the fight between e-books and printed books. If you're a devoted reader, you're probably already sick of the back and forth between the excitable technophiles and the stubborn Luddites. The proponents of e-books rave about the unexplored avenues, the hypertext, the entire world of literature accessible with just one click. The rest of us — well, we like the way books feel and smell, OK? It might seem sentimental, but that's falling in love for you.

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