Arts & Life

Education
5:46 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Creative Classes: An Artful Approach To Improving Performance

Jionni Anderson is a third grader at Savoy Elementary School. Anderson raises her hand to answer a question in Mr. Scott's keyboard class.
Lizzie Chen NPR

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 5:31 pm

This is the first in a three-part series about the intersection of education and the arts.

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Author Interviews
3:16 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

How Evangelical Christians Are Preaching The New Gospel Of Adoption

We're used to thinking of adoption as a way for infertile couples or single people to start a family or take in a child in need of a home.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:07 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Appreciating A Pillar Of The Chicago Sound: Trumpeter Bud Herseth

The late trumpeter Bud Herseth, former principal player for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra for over 50 years.
Jim Steere courtesy of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 10:06 am

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Monkey See
1:29 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Boston's Art Museums Offer Free Admission To Provide A 'Place Of Respite'

The Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston is offering free admission Tuesday.
Lisa Poole AP

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 4:11 pm

UPDATE, 4:08 p.m.: In addition to the institutions mentioned below, the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum has announced that admission will be free on Wednesday, April 17.

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The Two-Way
8:41 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Book News: Pulitzer Fiction-Prize Watchers Can Rest Easy This Year

Sig Gissler, administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes, announces the winners Monday at Columbia University in New York.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Stars In His Eyes, Sending Smoke Signals To Mars

ESA Getty Images

In his slim but beguiling novel Equilateral, Ken Kalfus places us inside the heads of his characters with such deftness that the line between what is true and what they believe to be true fades to obscurity. It's no coincidence that the heads in question belong to scientists who pride themselves on their evidence-based worldview; Kalfus delights in having readers continually gauge and recalibrate the distance between the world and his characters' seemingly objective observations of it.

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Author Interviews
3:53 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Is The United States A 'Dispensable Nation'?

Michael Krinke iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 2:04 pm

In The Dispensable Nation: American Foreign Policy In Retreat, former State Department adviser Vali Nasr describes veteran diplomat Richard Holbrooke being all but frozen out by President Obama's inner circle, for whom Nasr believes diplomacy was a "lost art."

Instead of engaging civilians to find political solutions in Afghanistan and beyond, they would look first to the military and intelligence agencies for solutions that were politically popular — that includes getting U.S. troops out of Afghanistan.

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Books
3:51 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Diverse List Of Future British Literary Stars In Latest 'Granta'

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 10:31 am

Literary magazine Granta has just released its latest Best of Young British Novelists issue. It's a hefty volume that comes out only once a decade, so making the cut is a major feat, putting its chosen in the company of modern literary legends like Salman Rushdie and David Mitchell.

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Europe
3:50 am
Tue April 16, 2013

Letters Of Heartbreak Find Some Love In Verona, Italy

The Juliet Club (Club di Giulietta) mailbox in Verona, Italy. Volunteers answer by hand every single letter that the club receives.
Courtesy of the Juliet Club

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 8:55 pm

Each year, the town of Verona, Italy — home of Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet — receives thousands of letters of heartache and unrequited love addressed to the play's star-crossed heroine.

The tradition of sending letters to Juliet very likely goes back centuries. People started by leaving notes on a local landmark said to be Juliet's tomb. Later, many started sending mail directly to the city. By the 1990s, Verona was receiving so many letters, it created an office to deal with it. And each letter — the Juliet Club office gets more than 6,000 a year — is answered by hand.

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The Two-Way
6:13 pm
Mon April 15, 2013

Granta's 'Best Of Young British Novelists' Shows A 'Disunited Kingdom'

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 7:36 pm

Once every decade, the literary magazine Granta publishes an issue called "Best of Young British Novelists," with short excerpts from the novels of 20 emerging authors. In the past, the list of names has proved unusually prescient, with authors such as Salman Rushdie, Martin Amis and Zadie Smith featured before they were widely read.

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