Arts & Life

The Two-Way
7:19 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Book News: Vast 'Digital Public Library Of America' Opens Today

Encyclopedia Britannica editions are seen at the New York Public Library on March 14, 2012 in New York City.
Mario Tama Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu April 18, 2013

With Mullet Or With Monkey, Everyone Knows Superman

Whether or not you give a damn for Superman, you know who he is. Even if you've never read a comic book in your life, no one can hear the name "Superman" without a flash of recognition: red-and-yellow S on blue background, red cape, the dark-haired man in flight, jaw set, blue eyes fixed on a distant destination. He's on his way to save the world.

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The Record
5:27 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Coachella's Hometown Aims To Cash In On Fest's Rising Tide

The crowd at Coachella on Sunday.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images for Coachella

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 4:30 pm

Like many California cities hit hard by the real estate crash, Indio (near Palm Springs) has been forced to make steep cutbacks to avoid bankruptcy. But unlike other cities, Indio hosts the highest-grossing music festival in the world — Coachella — which wraps up this weekend. It has made city leaders eager to capitalize on Coachella's riches.

Sam Torres, plumber by day, Indio city councilman by night, says he was prepared to become the most hated man in the city, and he very well may have achieved that goal. His offense? Proposing a 6 percent tax on Coachella tickets.

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The Record
5:03 am
Thu April 18, 2013

The Diverse Influence Of The 2013 Rock Hall Inductees

Public Enemy on stage in 1988. The group will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of fame Thursday.
Suzie Gibbons Redferns/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 12:22 pm

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Pop Culture
3:26 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Cleveland Celebrates Superman, Its Hometown Hero

Panels from Action Comics No. 1, the first Superman comic, adorn the site of illustrator Joe Shuster's former apartment building, long since demolished.
Brian Bull/WCPN

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 1:39 pm

April 18, 2013, is a big day for Superman. The Man of Steel, more powerful than a locomotive, turns 75. Most of us know Superman's story — faster than a speeding bullet, able to leap tall buildings in a single bound.

Less well-known is that the superhero is not native to the lost world of Krypton, nor the rural Kansas burg of Smallville. Superman is Cleveland's native son — at least as far as the city's residents are concerned.

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Author Interviews
5:37 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

A Real-Life Fight For Freedom In 'Nine Days'

Delacorte Press

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:10 am

Two high-school sophomores — Ethan Wynkoop and Ti-Anna Chen — sneak away from their homes in suburban Washington, D.C., and fly to Hong Kong. They're searching for Ti-Anna's father, a Chinese emigre and dissident who believes that China is just a spark away from democratic revolution.

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Education
5:07 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

More Than 50 Years Of Putting Kids' Creativity To The Test

E. Paul Torrance, shown here in the mid-'80s, spent most of his career studying and encouraging students' creativity.
Courtesy University of Georgia

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 5:30 pm

This is the second in a three-part series about the intersection of education and the arts.

Let's start with a question from a standardized test: "How would the world be different if we all had a third eye in the back of our heads?"

It's not a typical standardized question, but as part of the Next Generation Creativity Survey, it's used to help measure creativity a bit like an IQ test measures intelligence. And it's not the only creativity test out there.

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Movie Reviews
3:26 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Digging Into Ricky Jay's 'Deceptive' Card Tricks

Veteran magician Ricky Jay reveals much about himself in a new documentary on his life of deception. His card-trick techniques? That may be another story.
Kino Lorber

Originally published on Wed April 17, 2013 8:37 pm

When people talk about movie magic, they rarely mean card tricks. They're talking about digital wizardry and special effects.

But a new documentary called Deceptive Practice: The Mysteries and Mentors of Ricky Jay is all about card tricks — and a man who has devoted his life to them.

Card artist Ricky Jay keeps up a constant stream of chatter in his act onstage — everything from gambling poems to stories about The Great Cardini — and it's all very entertaining, but the patter is designed to distract you from what he's doing.

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The Salt
2:57 pm
Wed April 17, 2013

Science In A Scoop: Making Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream

The store uses a patented machine to keep ingredients churning and mix in the liquid nitrogen in a safe, controlled manner.
Alan Greenblatt NPR

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 12:14 pm

Robyn Sue Fisher's ice cream shop, Smitten, in San Francisco's Hayes Valley, may at moments resemble a high school chemistry lab, but that's because Fisher uses liquid nitrogen to freeze her product.

Nitrogen is "a natural element," she notes. "It's all around us."

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Monkey See
10:37 am
Wed April 17, 2013

'Off Pitch': A Show-Choir Story From The American Midwest

Director Rob takes charge of a rehearsal in VH1's Off Pitch.
VH1

Beware, Midwesterners: reality television is coming for you.

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