Arts & Life

NPR Story
7:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Troubles Linger In 'Shadow Dancer'

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:22 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

"Shadow Dancer," is the name of the new film from James Marsh. The director won an Oscar for his 2008 documentary, "Man on a Wire," and his film, "Project Nim," was also a documentary winner at Sundance. But his latest is a fictional film based on very real events, the bloody civil war in Northern Ireland known as The Troubles. Pat Dowell has more.

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Arts & Life
7:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Topping The Art-Collection Charts

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:22 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

You know Americans love lists - 100 best films, best barbeque joints, best cheesecakes. Each year, ARTnews magazine compiles a list of the biggest spenders in the art world. Some of the names may be familiar, some are surprising, some maybe a little of both. Milton Esterow is the editor and publisher of ARTnews and joins us from our studios in New York. Thanks so much for being with us.

MILTON ESTEROW: Nice to be here.

SIMON: Are these folks just big spenders or something more?

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Food
7:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

A Summery Spread That's As Cool As A Cucumber

Benedictine is a combination of cream cheese, cucumber and onion. It may sound odd, unless you're from Kentucky.
Erica Peterson WFPL

Originally published on Sun July 14, 2013 1:58 pm

Cream cheese, cucumber juice and a touch of onion. That may sound like an unlikely combination, but Benedictine is a Kentucky favorite. Gwynne Potts, a self-proclaimed aficionado, says it's delicious.

"The best thing to eat Benedictine on is just white bread," Potts says. "No special bread; it only takes away from the Benedictine."

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Author Interviews
7:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

How Cricket Mirrors Indian Society, For Better And For Worse

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:22 pm

Americans can seem a little sports-crazy, thanks to multimillion-dollar salaries for stars and big games that are practically national holidays. But our passion for sports has its limits: football, baseball and basketball, yes. Cricket? Not so much. In contrast, perhaps no country has more passion for a sport — any sport — than India has for cricket.

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News
7:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Royal Baby Speculation Rages

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 11:36 am

Whether it's a boy or a girl, Kate Middleton and Prince William's baby, due to be born Saturday, will become third living heir to the British throne. Weekend Edition Saturday host Scott Simon talks to Daily Mail columnist Robert Hardman about the royal baby.

Deceptive Cadence
7:16 am
Sat July 13, 2013

From Carnegie Hall, A Youth Orchestra That's A National First

Conductor Valery Gergiev leads the National Youth Orchestra through its first rehearsal with the maestro, at Purchase College outside New York City.
Chris Lee

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 1:22 pm

It's a hot summer afternoon and the recital hall at Purchase College is abuzz with excitement and nervous energy. One hundred and twenty teenagers, from 42 states, are about to embark on an extraordinary musical and personal journey.

Clive Gillinson, executive director of Carnegie Hall, steps up to the podium to greet them. "Welcome to all of you," he says. "It's wonderful to welcome you here to the first-ever National Youth Orchestra of the United States of America!"

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Sat July 13, 2013

A Memoir About Finding One's Place In The Natural World

The latest addition to a body of work that includes six novels, a short story collection, and editorship of several folk tale anthologies, I Hate to Leave This Beautiful Place is just the right sort of read for those who usually take in non-fiction with a grim reluctance, as if it were cod liver oil. I was drawn by its promise of a memoir structured around five "incidents of arresting strangeness" in the author's life. I was not disappointed.

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Food
7:03 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Food In Science Fiction: In The Future, We Will All Eat Lasers

Ex-chef Jason Sheehan fears a robotic future without the humanity of food.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 2:44 pm

Near the beginning of the Road Warrior there is a scene in which Mel Gibson's character eats dog food.

It is a perfect moment, a beautiful moment, a completely defining moment — a pause in the post-apocalyptic action where the writers gave us everything we needed to know about Gibson's Max Rockatansky in one, long, wordless scene. And it was a moment that — watching the movie at likely far too young an age on some long-gone Saturday night at the drive-in — messed me up for life.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:08 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Not My Job: A 'Gilligan's Island' Quiz For Novelist Gillian Flynn

Heidi Jo Brady

Gillian Flynn is a very nice person who writes books about very unpleasant people. Her suspenseful, best-selling mystery novel Gone Girl is told from the perspective of Nick and Amy, a couple who are as unreliable as narrators as they are as spouses.

Since Flynn's name, Gillian, is just one letter short of "Gilligan," we've invited her to answer three questions about the classic TV series Gilligan's Island.

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Movie Interviews
6:09 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Guillermo Del Toro, On Monsters And Meaning

A child of the '60s and '70s, Guadalajara-born director Guillermo del Toro has been a fan of the Japanese kaiju film tradition since he was a kid. His latest movie, Pacific Rim, is his passion project and homage to the genre.
Rafy Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 6:26 pm

From the audience-pleasing Hellboy to the critically acclaimed Pan's Labyrinth, Guillermo del Toro's movies are chock-full of mystical, often terrifying creatures. Now the Mexico-born director has made a big-budget entry in the genre that helped define his fascination with the monstrous: the Japanese kaiju films of the '60s.

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