Arts & Life

Arts & Life
4:43 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

The Man Behind The Mask: A Profile Of The Lone Ranger

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:58 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

My colleague, Robert Siegel, is off today for the holiday. But, we're going to return with him now to a thrilling day of yesteryear. Yesteryear being five years ago. That's right it's a shameless re-run. And our excuse is the new "Lone Ranger" movie, which has opened to mixed reviews. The old TV show, which aired in the 1950s, was a favorite of Robert's when he was a boy. So, for our 2008 series, In Character, Robert marked "The Lone Ranger's" 75th anniversary.

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The Salt
12:17 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Fizz And Fireworks: Make A Patriotic Homemade Soda For The Fourth

Audie Cornish for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 12:38 pm

If you haven't heard the buzz — or maybe it's the fizz — handmade sodas have been experiencing a full-on revival over the past few years. Whether they're mixed at home with a Soda Stream-like device or made at an old-fashioned soda fountain, the rise of homemade sodas has been driven by a general shift toward less-processed foods.

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Arts & Life
12:13 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

Does Macklemore Really Thrift Shop?

Macklemore and Ryan Lewis are chart-topping rap sensations. In a special rebroadcast, they sat down last year with guest host Celeste Headlee to talk about their latest album 'The Heist' a few months before their fame hit its biggest heights.

Parallels
9:45 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Where The Mask Seen In Global Protests Is Made

A woman cleans Guy Fawkes masks, used by many demonstrators in protests around the world and in the recent wave of demonstrations in Brazil, at a factory assembly line in Sao Goncalo, near Rio de Janeiro, June 28.
Ricardo Moraes Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 10:42 am

Remember the mask from protests here ...

... here ...

... and here?

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

City, Comedy And Calamity In Cathleen Schine's New Novel

Apartment building in Greenwich Village
iStockphoto.com

Cathleen Schine can always be counted on for an enticing, smart read, and her latest novel, Fin & Lady, is no exception, but it's an odd duck, as quirky as its peculiarly named titular half-siblings. Neither as sparklingly funny as her most recent book, The Three Weissmanns of Westport, nor as brainy as her earlier Rameau's Niece, Fin & Lady is light, entertaining, and ultimately moving, but you can't help wondering what Schine hoped to achieve with it.

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Book Reviews
7:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

A Tale Of The Estranged And The Just Plain Strange In 'New School'

Dash Shaw is a graphic novelist and animator whose previous books, including Bottomless Belly Button and Bodyworld, seethe with dark, mischievous intent. He sets out to unsettle, using the unique tools the comics medium provides to expose discomfiting truths about relationships both familial and romantic. A proud experimentalist, Shaw often shuns tidy narrative conventions in favor of raw emotion.

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Author Interviews
3:09 am
Thu July 4, 2013

For 'Star-Spangled Banner,' A Long Road From Song To Anthem

American lawyer Francis Scott Key witnessed the bombardment of Fort McHenry from a boat about 8 miles away.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:48 am

All over the country on Thursday, fireworks will light up the sky. In many places, those fireworks will come with a patriotic soundtrack — one that wouldn't be complete without "The Star-Spangled Banner." The song officially became America's national anthem in 1931, but it's been around since the early 19th century.

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Food
4:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Just As American As Chorizo

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we continue our discussion on the history and traditions of Independence Day. Sure, there are parades and John Philip Sousa marches, but for many Americans, the grilled hot dogs and hamburgers are as important as the fireworks. Historian Kenneth C. Davis told us earlier that Fourth of July celebrations began in 1776, but the foods we now consider traditional didn't arrive until much later.

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History
4:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

How Slavery Almost Made It Into The Declaration

More than any other day of the year, the Fourth of July is a time to take pride in American history. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks to author Kenneth C. Davis about what you shouldn't forget this Independence Day.

The Record
3:50 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

When Pop Stars Flirt With Bad Taste

YouTube

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 10:30 am

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