Arts & Life

Author Interviews
5:32 am
Sat September 7, 2013

Suspicious? In 'United States Of Paranoia,' It's Not Just You

Conspiracy theorists and other protesters march through downtown Denver on Aug. 26, 2008.
Ben Woloszyn AP

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 1:01 pm

Weekend Edition gets a lot of emails that start like this: "Why don't you tell the truth about ..." The Kennedy assassination, Sept. 11, the Lincoln assassination, the birthplace of Barack Obama or John McCain, Pearl Harbor, Area 51, black helicopters or the moon landing — fill in the blank however you like.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:06 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Not My Job: We Ask Australian Baz Luhrmann About Austria

Vittorio Zunino Celotto Getty Images

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 5:25 am

Baz Luhrmann's first movie, Strictly Ballroom, was a cheap, independent romance set in the world of ballroom dancing. The 1992 film became an international hit. Since then, the director, writer and producer has become known for his lavish operatic movies like Romeo + Juliet, Moulin Rouge! and the recent The Great Gatsby.

Read more
Theater
5:20 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

'Mr. Burns' And Friends, Surviving Long Past The End Times

Who's That Masked Marge? Jennifer R. Morris (left), with Sam Breslin Wright, Gibson Frazier, Colleen Werthmann and Susannah Flood, in the third act of Mr. Burns: A Post-Electric Play, a Simpsons-inspired fantasia of loss and remembrance by Anne Washburn.
Joan Marcus Playwrights Horizons

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 6:11 pm

If the world as we know it comes to an end, will art survive? And if it does, what kinds of stories will be told after the apocalypse? The answer might surprise you.

The lights come up on a group of people around a campfire in the woods, trying to recall all the details of the hilarious Simpsons episode "Cape Feare," a parody of the Robert Mitchum and Robert De Niro movies, in which Bart Simpson is stalked by the evil but incompetent Sideshow Bob.

Read more
Pop Culture
5:20 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

After Dave Chappelle Hates On Hartford, Who's To Blame?

Comedian Dave Chappelle caused some controversy at a comedy festival in Hartford, Conn. last week, after he got upset at hecklers and walked off stage. Depending on who you ask, Hartford was a horrible, racist audience — or just had a bad night.

All Tech Considered
5:20 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

This Is Musician Mickey Hart's Brain On Music

Musician Mickey Hart in a cap that collects electrical activity in his brain.
Tamarind Jones Courtesy of Nvidia

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:20 pm

Peering inside our mind and capturing images of our thoughts has become a preoccupation in much of neuroscience. It's also an unlikely part of the light show at a Mickey Hart Band concert.

Yes, the musician best known as the percussionist for the Grateful Dead for more than 20 years jams with a light show powered by his mind.

Read more
Television
2:23 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Radio Rewind: Monty Hall

In 1993, Monty Hall, host of the game show Let's Make a Deal, joined us on the program to discuss how contestants used risk and probability to win big prizes.

Shots - Health News
1:53 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Turns Out Your Kids Really Did Love That Music You Played

Mom loved him. You love him. Prince performing in 1985.
Ron Wolfson Landov

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 10:17 am

Way back in the 1980s, were you the one playing "When Doves Cry" over and over? Well, don't be surprised if your kids wind up doing the same thing.

Young adults have strong positive memories of the music their parents loved when they were the same age, a study finds. That flies in the face of the cultural stereotype that children reject their parents' taste in music.

Read more
Monkey See
8:03 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Blue Jasmine' And A Summer Movie Postmortem

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

As summer was giving way to fall, preseason football was giving way to actual football, and Linda Holmes' week was giving way to the Toronto International Film Festival, the Pop Culture Happy Hour gang managed to gather just long enough to look back on a divisive summer full of big, loud, robot-on-robot movies. Our own postmortem can't help but skim past other postmortems — was Man of Steel a hit or a flop?

Read more
The Two-Way
7:20 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Book News: Sushmita Banerjee, Indian Author Who Fled Taliban, Shot Dead

Author Sushmita Banerjee poses at a 2002 news conference announcing the launch of the movie Escape From Taliban, which is based on her memoir A Kabuliwala's Bengali Wife.
Sebastian D'Souza AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 7:58 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
Book Reviews
7:03 am
Fri September 6, 2013

After Tragedy, Lost Live On In 'Maid's Version' Of The Story

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:20 pm

For readers new to Daniel Woodrell's work, The Maid's Version is a perfect introduction and an invitation to read more. It's a short book — almost a novella at a mere 164 pages — but there are lifetimes captured here. Woodrell sets the story in his beloved Missouri Ozarks, and he writes with clear-eyed observation, introducing the reader to characters whose lives are shaped as much by their rural landscape as by the moral ambiguities — the collective lies, constraints and collusions — that form the necessary glue holding their community together.

Read more

Pages