Arts & Life

Books
11:57 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Could Banning Books Actually Encourage More Readers?

What do the books "The Catcher in the Rye," "Invisible Man" and Anne Frank's diary have in common? They've all been banned from libraries. On Sunday, the American Library Association begins its annual recognition of Banned Books Week. Tell Me More host Michel Martin talks to former ALA president Loriene Roy about targeted books, and efforts to keep them on shelves.

Barbershop
11:48 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Is Public Numb To Mass Shootings?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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TED Radio Hour
10:28 am
Fri September 20, 2013

What Are The Dangers Of A Single Story?

Novelist Chimamanda Adichie at the TEDGlobal conference in 2009.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 19, 2013 1:25 pm

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode Framing The Story.

About Chimamanda Adichie's TEDTalk

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

About Chimamanda Adichie

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Movie Reviews
9:52 am
Fri September 20, 2013

In 'Rush' As In Real Life, It's The Driver, Not The Car

The radically different Formula One racers James Hunt (Chris Hemsworth, left) and Niki Lauda (Daniel Bruhl) are at the center of Ron Howard's Rush, a biographical drama that's as strong on character as on cars.
Jaap Buitendijk Universal Pictures

You might think that if the driving scenes in your auto-racing movie are the least interesting thing about it, that's a problem. But it's far from a sign of engine trouble for Rush, a swift-moving, character-rich biopic whose kinetic Grand Prix sequences are constantly being overshadowed by genuinely riveting scenes of ... people talking.

But then in a film written by Peter Morgan — of The Queen and Frost/Nixon -- maybe it's no wonder that questions like why they drive, why they want to win and who they want to beat take center stage.

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Monkey See
9:18 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Pop Culture Happy Hour: Autumn Leaves, Cumberbatches, And More Fall Amusements

Martin Freeman as the Hobbit Bilbo Baggins in The Hobbit: The Desolation Of Smaug.
Mark Pokorny Warner Brothers Pictures
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

This week's show finds me, Stephen, Trey and Glen together again in the studio, but due to a scheduling tweak, finds us in Historic Studio 45 instead of Historic Studio 44, so we hope you can all still follow the conversation.

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All Tech Considered
4:35 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Female Fans Love New Grand Theft Auto Despite Demeaning Content

A close view of the packaging of Grand Theft Auto V at the midnight opening at the HMV music store in London on Tuesday. It made history with a record $800 million in sales on its first day. This version continues to generate controversy over its glorification of violence, drugs and its demeaning portraits of women.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 2:02 pm

Grand Theft Auto made video game history this week: The latest version of the game had a record $800 million in sales on its first day. As with past versions, the game is generating controversy over its glorification of violence and drugs and its demeaning portrayal of women.

But around 15 percent of its fans are women, who find much to like about the game, even if they do have some ambivalence about it.

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Pop Culture
5:16 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Grand Theft Auto V, Out Tuesday, Already Made $800 Million

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:07 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

More than $800 million. That's how much money the videogame "Grand Theft Auto V" earned in just one day. The last version of the game, released back in 2008 made a measly $310 million on its opening day. "Grand Theft Auto V" is also now on track to out-earn the summer's biggest movie blockbusters in only a few days. So what's going on here? We're joined by Peter Rubin, a senior editor at Wired, to find out. Hi there, Peter.

PETER RUBIN: How are you, Audie?

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Don't Worry, Kids, These (Sex) Addicts Are All Right

Mark Ruffalo and Gwyneth Paltrow star in Thanks for Sharing, a heartfelt if overstuffed take on addiction and recovery.
Anne Joyce Lionsgate/Roadside Attractions

Somewhere between Tim Robbins' angry assumption about his wife's pain pills and Pink's ecstatic-dance excursion with the guy from Book of Mormon, I realized that the dealing-with-addiction drama Thanks for Sharing really, really wanted to tell me everything it knows about life in recovery. As a critic, I've gotta acknowledge the problems that kind of crowding creates for a storyteller. As a person, I've gotta admire the generosity it bespeaks.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

A 'Shot' In The Gloom, And All Hell Breaks Loose

Sam Rockwell plays John Moon, an unemployed farmer who launches a series of unfortunate and bloody events after he mistakenly shoots a woman while hunting a deer.
Tribeca Film/Well Go USA Entertainment.

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 5:52 pm

Watch enough TV or movies these days, and you're likely to witness a throat getting slit. Not off-screen, or in a flash, but performed in full view of an unflinching camera. Call it authenticity, call it chutzpah or call it sadism, it takes only a few episodes of, say, Boardwalk Empire or Breaking Bad to realize that our visual storytellers are increasingly going for the gore.

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Movie Reviews
5:03 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

'Enough,' Almost, But At Least There's Gandolfini

After James Gandolfini's death this past June, the actor's turn in Enough Said, where he stars opposite Julia Louis-Dreyfus as a man looking for a second chance at love, has taken on a tinge of the bittersweet.
Lacey Terrell Fox Searchlight

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 5:40 pm

It was writer-director Nicole Holofcener's good fortune, and her bad luck, to have snagged James Gandolfini for Enough Said, her comedy about two imminent empty-nesters dipping their toes into fresh romantic waters. Given his untimely death, the film is likely to be remembered less for its own modest virtues than as a last chance to say a bittersweet farewell to its star.

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