Arts & Life

Movie Interviews
5:29 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

At 13, 'Book Thief' Star Picks The Screen Over The Balance Beam

Sophie Nelisse says years of training as a gymnast taught her to focus in ways that helped her acting on the set of The Book Thief.
Jules Heath Twentieth Century Fox

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 8:38 pm

At 13, Sophie Nelisse is already making big career decisions. She started training to be a gymnast at the age of 3 and has long had dreams to represent Canada in the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

"If you want to train at a national, international level, you have about [one] week of break per year," Nelisse tells host Arun Rath. "So I was training about six hours per day."

She put that part of her life aside when she was given another opportunity of a lifetime: to play the lead in the film The Book Thief.

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The New And The Next
5:29 pm
Sat November 16, 2013

Making Moves In Food Delivery, Chess And Health Care

Courtesy of Ozy.com

Originally published on Sat December 7, 2013 3:29 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

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Book Reviews
5:30 am
Sat November 16, 2013

The Fun In 'Black-Haired Girl' Isn't The Plot — It's The People

iStockphoto.com

Robert Stone won the National Book Award in 1975, for his second novel, Dog Soldiers. Since then, he's twice been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and nominated for or the recipient of a florist's display of other honors. Recently, when I asked some writers and English professors at a party to name the best novel ever written about Hollywood, Stone's Children of Light was the top choice.

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Movie Interviews
5:29 am
Sat November 16, 2013

On The Timeless Appeal Of 'Calvin & Hobbes'

Joel Allen Schroeder dove into the world of Calvin & Hobbes for Dear Mr. Watterson, an admiring documentary about the strip.
Gravitas Ventures/Submarine Deluxe

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 6:39 pm

Bill Watterson brought an end to Calvin & Hobbes in 1995, after just 10 years of writing and drawing the comic strip. But to his many devoted fans, that shockheaded boy and his tiger are as important today as they were when they first appeared in daily papers all around the country.

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Arts & Life
10:12 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

'Sacrificial Poets' Teach Students How To Spit Poetry

Starr Seward, the Sacrificial Poets’ Program Coordinator, writes down 'problems of the world' on the whiteboard.
Tasnim Shamma

Spoken word poetry is about dramatic storytelling. A Raleigh performance poetry group called Sacrificial Poets is performing at UNC Charlotte this weekend. They're in town for a three-day residency that involves teaching college students and visiting some local schools to teach them about the art of busting a rhyme.

Sacrificial Poets artist director Kane "Novakane" Smego, starts off the class with a piece about growing up in Durham with a single mother.  

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
7:03 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Astronaut Chris Hadfield Plays Not My Job

Originally published on Sat November 16, 2013 6:54 pm

The International Space Station is a pretty great backdrop for a music video, and Commander Chris Hadfield didn't waste the opportunity as he was orbiting the Earth (at 17,500 miles an hour) back in the spring of 2012. The Canadian astronaut performed his own rendition of David Bowie's "Space Oddity" — and also tweeted and blogged from orbit, making him the de facto ambassador from Outer Space.

Since Hadfield sang about Major Tom in space, we've invited him to answer three questions about some lesser-known Toms.

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Books
6:03 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

In A Storm's Wake, Two Books Help Make Sense Of What Remains

Typhoon Haiyan survivors walk through the ruins of their neighborhood on the outskirts of Tacloban, central Philippines, on Wednesday.
David Guttenfelder AP

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:07 pm

Late last week, Typhoon Haiyan tore through the Philippines, leaving rubble for wake and cities in shambles. It was among the strongest storms ever recorded. In the days that have followed, the death toll exacted by the storm has reached breathtaking levels — more than 3,500 fatalities by last count — and the economic devastation must be measured in the billions.

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Movie Interviews
4:46 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Steve Coogan, Tacking Toward The Funny Side Of Serious

Steve Coogan acts alongside Judi Dench in Philomena, the story of a woman searching for her son and the cynical journalist helping her find him.
Alex Bailey The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:07 pm

Philomena is the true story of a retired Irish nurse (Judi Dench) whose child was put up for adoption — against her will, by the nuns at the convent where she gave birth — when she was a teenager, and unwed. Fifty years later, a journalist grudgingly joins in her search for that son. The British comedian Steve Coogan, who also produced the project and co-wrote the screenplay, plays the reporter.

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Television
4:29 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Amazon Opens An Entertainment Door With 'Alpha House'

Mark Consuelos (from left), John Goodman, Clark Johnson and Matt Malloy star as four Republican senators sharing a house in Washington in Alpha House, Amazon's first original series.
Amazon Studios

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 8:07 pm

There are about a dozen reasons I really wanted to love Alpha House, an original comedy series about four U.S. senators sharing a home on Capitol Hill. It premieres on Amazon — yes, Amazon — on Friday.

The biggest reason: often-underrated star John Goodman, playing a politician up for re-election who knows exactly what voters value in a legislator:

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Movie Reviews
2:57 pm
Fri November 15, 2013

Across 'Nebraska,' On A Journey That Goes Beyond The Trip

David (Will Forte, left) and his father, Woody (Bruce Dern, center), take time out of their quixotic journey to stop in Woody's small Nebraska hometown — where Woody's old business partner, Ed (Stacy Keach), is still nursing a grudge.
Merie W. Wallace Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 5:47 pm

Last month, I saw the trailer for Alexander Payne's Nebraska, and only the fact that it was a Payne film made me want to see it.

The premise seemed a dead end: Bruce Dern plays an elderly man named Woody Grant living in Billings, Mont., who gets a letter saying he's won $1 million. All he needs to do is call a number and maybe buy a magazine subscription.

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