Arts & Life

Code Switch
4:56 am
Tue July 29, 2014

Crime Writer Creates A Hero For Her Beloved, Much-Maligned South LA

Hall sits in a sunny bay window to write. "My first drafts are always in long hand, on legal pads," she explains. "I love putting pen to paper."
Andre Ellis

Originally published on Tue July 29, 2014 7:00 am

Rachel Howzell Hall is easing her big, laurel green Mercedes sedan through the streets of Los Angeles. A slim woman with big eyes, Hall says this Benz is her dream car, the thing she'd planned to buy for herself once she'd become a successful writer, probably around age 50.

But something happened to speed up her schedule.

"When I was 33 years old," Hall says, "I was diagnosed with a rare type of breast cancer. And I was pregnant. And it was terrifying."

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The Salt
5:54 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Korean Steak Sandwich

This photo also featured in BuzzFeed's "21 Unbelievable Beverage Can Photobombs."
NPR

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 6:16 pm

Ever since we landed in San Francisco and refused to leave, we've heard people talking about the Korean steak sandwich at Rhea's Deli and Market. People say things like "It's amazing" and "Get away from me, I'm trying to eat" and "Did you just lick a drop of sauce off of my shirt? I'm calling the police."

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Book Reviews
5:05 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Book Review: 'A Replacement Life'

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 7:40 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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Movies
5:05 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Box Office Wallows In A Summer Slump, And Some Seek To Find Out Why

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Code Switch
5:05 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Tales Of Migration Explore Modern-Day Odysseys And 'Hyphenated Identities'

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 7:55 pm

For many writers, the migrant's journey is a storytellers' dream. The transition from one part of the world to another is filled with anticipation, conflict and inherent literary drama. While trains and planes become the mundane means of transportation for most travelers, those trips can herald life-changing transformations for a migrant remaking his or her life through that journey.

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Mon July 28, 2014

Book News: The Clash Of The Comic(-)Cons

Fans dressed as stormtroopers from Star Wars attend this year's Comic-Con event in San Diego.
Frazer Harrison Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 8:57 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:00 am
Mon July 28, 2014

The Great War At 100: Music Of Conflict And Remembrance

Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein (who later became an American citizen) lost an arm in World War I. He commissioned composers including Maurice Ravel to write pieces for the left hand alone.
Bettmann/CORBIS

Originally published on Mon July 28, 2014 2:37 pm

One hundred years ago today, the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia. The conflict drew in country after country and grew to an unprecedented scale. An estimated 9 million combatants lost their lives and more than 21 million were wounded in what came to be known as The Great War and, eventually, World War I.

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Author Interviews
5:14 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

'Love And Drowning' In The U.S. Virgin Islands

The Land of Love And Drowning follows a family living in the U.S. Virgin Islands in the early 20th century.
Brennan Linsley AP

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 6:52 pm

In the new novel Land of Love and Drowning, the Virgin Islands and the ocean around them make for a magical setting.

The book follows three generations of one family living through the modern history of the territory as it passes from Danish to American hands.

It's also laced with magical realism: One main character can sense people's arrival; another family only gives birth to men, generation after generation; and one woman has a hoofed leg instead of one of her feet.

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Arts & Life
5:02 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

What It's Like To Own Your Very Own Harrier Jump Jet

A 1976 Hawker Siddeley Harrier GR3 Jump Jet sold at the Silverstone Auctions Saturday for the equivalent of $179,611.
Courtesy of Silverstone Auction

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 6:52 pm

The Harrier Jump Jet combines the speed of a jet with the maneuverability of a helicopter.

These single-seater planes are known for vertical take-offs and landings, making them ideal for close-air support near the front-lines where runways may be damaged or non-existent.

Designed by the British and now flown by the U.S. Marine Corps, Harriers also have an accident-prone track record and are notoriously difficult to fly.

But why not have one for your private collection?

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Performing Arts
8:12 am
Sun July 27, 2014

At Some Venues, iPads Take The Place Of Opera Glasses

Originally published on Sun July 27, 2014 11:26 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Arun Rath.

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