Affordable Housing

Activist Bree Newsome (right) talks with Atlantic staff writer and Charlotte native Vann Newkirk II.
David Boraks / WFAE

A wave of police shootings in recent years has left authorities in Charlotte and across the nation searching for ways to rebuild trust. Speakers at a forum uptown Tuesday organized by The Atlantic magazine focused on the city's history of racism and segregation as well as a criminal justice system that they say treats people of color and those with lower incomes unfairly.

Charlotte City Council Members Lawana Mayfield and Ed Driggs are responding to a report that finds Charlotte's need for affordable housing far exceeds the 5,000 units city council has pledged to create in the next three years.

City council was informed by city staff on Monday that at least 34,000 units of affordable housing are needed, especially for low-income residents.

Chris Kizzie of Enterprise Community Advisors (right) and Pamela Wideman of the city's Housing and Neighborhood Services department gave a presentation on affordable housing to the city council Monday.
David Boraks / WFAE

City officials say Charlotte is nearly halfway to a goal set last year of creating 5,000 affordable housing units over three years. But at the Charlotte City Council Monday night, council members, staff and citizens all said it's not enough - especially for those with very low incomes.

Housing CLT Makes Step Toward Combating Homelessness

Jul 27, 2017
Crystal Hogue / WFAE

The City of Charlotte wants landlords to be part of the effort to reduce homelessness. Part of the plan is to convince them to set aside one percent of affordable units in their buildings. That process started Wednesday.

MARK RUMSEY / WFAE

Charlotte nonprofit Supportive Housing Communities (SHC) has purchased St. John's Place, a 32-unit apartment building in east Charlotte for $850,000.  The group plans to renovate the units and make other improvements.  

St. John's Place c

Cuyahoga / Flickr

The city of Charlotte is investing $200,000 in federal money in a program to help people find affordable housing. It’s called HousingCLT. Think of it like the website Zillow where you can search for available homes, but with a focus on affordability. The city has set a goal to build 5,000 new affordable housing units in the next 3 to 5 years. But HousingCLT is faster and more cost-effective, says Brian Huskey, the project director.  

Courtesy of Lawana Mayfield

Affordable housing. It’s a term we hear a lot in Charlotte.  But what does it mean? According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, housing is considered affordable if no more than 30 percent of income is spent on household expenses. For Charlotte, that amounts to a wage of about $17.12 needed in order to afford market-rate housing.  

bridge over I-85
Jennifer Lang / WFAE

Charlotte voters have an extra page at the bottom of their ballots this month. The city is asking voters to approve $218.44 million in bonds for transportation, housing and neighborhood improvements.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts
David Boraks / WFAE

The police shooting of an African -American man in Charlotte last month sparked protests not just about policing, but also about racism and inequality. In an open letter a week ago, Charlotte City Council pledged new policies and programs. Monday night, the council took what it called "the first steps."

In a single unanimous vote, the City Council approved a series of measures in response to community anger and frustration after the shooting of Keith Lamont Scott.  They include:

Developers Pass On Charlotte Low-Income Housing Incentive

Oct 10, 2015
Charlotte Observer

By Steve Harrison/Charlotte Observer

Nearly three years ago, the Charlotte City Council approved an affordable housing “density bonus” for developers.

If a developer wanted to build in affluent areas, the city would allow it to build extra units if it included some apartments or homes for low-income residents.

But no one has participated in the program, and the city may be starting over.

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