Affordable Housing

City of Charlotte

Charlotte City Council members will vote Monday night on a budget that boosts salaries for police officers and firefighters. The $2.6 billion budget would also increase Charlotte’s property tax rate for the first time in five years.   

CHARMECK.ORG

Mecklenburg County Manager Dena Diorio will present her budget recommendations for the coming year to county commissioners Tuesday.  This year’s county budget process comes at a time when funding for public education is in the spotlight. 

Map shows the location of the planned Seventh & Tryon redevelopment.
SeventhandTryon.com

Five development teams have been asked to submit proposals to redevelop a two-block area along North Tryon Street in uptown Charlotte.  The planned Seventh & Tryon project would include shops, offices, a hotel, and affordable and market-rate apartments alongside a new or renovated Charlotte-Mecklenburg Main Library.

City Manager Marcus Jones presented his budget to the City Council Monday.
Charlotte Mecklenburg Government Channel

Charlotte City Manager Marcus Jones has proposed a $2.6 billion budget for the new fiscal year that starts July 1. It calls for pay increases of 6.5 percent for police and 3 percent for other city staff. He also wants to boost the size of a planned affordable housing bond referendum this fall to $50 million.

Charlotte City Council members assembled for their meeting Monday night.
David Boraks / WFAE

The Charlotte city council voted Monday night to help finance 11 proposed affordable apartment projects around the city. But only a handful likely will move forward this year. 

Charlotte City Council members discussed the budget before passing it Monday night.
City of Charlotte

Charlotte City Council tonight could approve nearly $24 million in subsidies for 950 new affordable apartments around the city. 

Charlotte skyline at dusk
silicon640c / Flickr / https://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/by-2.0/

Charlotte residents can add their voices to the city’s ongoing discussions about affordable housing during Monday's City Council meeting.  

Sonja Chisholm runs Gracious Hands, a transitional housing home in northwest Charlotte.
David Boraks / WFAE

Charlotte native Sonja Chisholm was working as a supervisor at a soft-drink distributor when she and a friend founded the non-profit, Gracious Hands, in 2015. It's what's called a "transitional home" - a place for homeless women and their children to stay while they're working their way toward permanent housing.

Lyn Alexis, 25, lives at Gracious Hands with her daughter, Iori, 5.
David Boraks / WFAE

Affordable housing is a top priority for Charlotte city leaders.  It takes many forms - from workforce housing for moderate-income residents, to subsidized housing for those with very low incomes. There's also transitional housing, aimed at helping people move from homelessness to permanent housing.

Gracious Hands is one of a handful of low-cost temporary housing programs in the city.

Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles spoke during the city council retreat in Durham Thursday.
David Boraks / WFAE

Charlotte Mayor Vi Lyles says the city is about two-thirds of the way toward a three-year goal to add 5,000 affordable housing units. But that's far short of what's needed, and existing units are disappearing as well. So the council spent a day at its annual budget retreat in Durham Thursday exploring ideas. 

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