Affordable Care Act

Kaiser Health News

Health insurance premiums have been rising on the Obamacare exchanges, and North Carolina had some of the country's biggest increases this year. But according to a recent federal report, those increases made very little difference in what consumers actually pay.

healthcare.gov screenshot
WFAE

On the Obamacare exchanges, there are large disparities in how health insurance premiums are changing next year based on where you live. While coverage is getting cheaper in states like Indiana and Mississippi, in North Carolina, it's becoming much more expensive. Federal data show that North Carolina's average premium increase is among the highest in the country.

nffcnnr / Flickr

North Carolina consumers who purchase their own health insurance will pay more next year. The State Department of Insurance approved average rate increases of between 10 and 33 percent. 

Michael Tomsic

Roughly half a million North Carolinians could soon lose money they depend on for health insurance. The U.S. Supreme Court will rule as soon as next week on a key part of the Affordable Care Act. It governs federal subsidies for states like North Carolina that did not set up their own exchange or marketplace. It may sound wonky, but the result could be disastrous for many low-income Americans and insurance markets.

Alan Cleaver/Flickr
Alan Cleaver / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

In North Carolina, health insurance companies are planning to raise average premiums between 11 and 26 percent next year on the Affordable Care Act exchange or marketplace.

The state's dominant insurance company, BlueCross BlueShield, wants to raise average premiums about 26 percent – almost twice as much as last year's increase.   

Michael Tomsic

In Charlotte and across the country, there’s a growing need at community health centers. They treat patients regardless of their ability to pay. And the increased need is a surprising result to some clinic leaders, who thought the Affordable Care Act would mean fewer people needing charity care.

healthcare.gov

The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Wednesday in a case that North Carolina's attorney general and many others say could lead to chaos in health insurance markets.

NCDP.org

North Carolina's attorney general is joining those from about 20 other states in asking the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold a key part of Obamacare. The attorneys general filed a friend-of-the-court brief last week.

Protests have continued around the nation and in North Carolina this weekend, aimed at calling attention to police killings of unarmed black men.  In Fayetteville Saturday, marchers waved signs along the curb of Ski-bo Road, chanting "Hands Up, Don't Shoot." Passing motorists honked their horns in support.  Police didn't have an estimate of the number of marchers.  And in downtown Charlotte yesterday afternoon, about 60 people protested at Trade and Tryon streets.

Tobacco Headquarters To Become Hotel, Apartments

Jun 29, 2014

A Philadelphia company has announced plans to buy and re-develop the historic R.J. Reynolds Tobacco headquarters in Winston-Salem. PMC Property Group plans to spend $7.8 million to buy the 22-story building, and to invest an estimated $60 million overall in the conversion.  Plans call for a boutique hotel on the bottom six floors, and 120 luxury residential units above.

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