Accountable Care Organizations

Medicaid is always one of the biggest expenditures for states, and North Carolina is overhauling its program to try to make its budget more predictable. The overhaul is essentially a mixture of health care models that are gaining national prominence. The result will change who's in charge of keeping low-income patients healthy and how North Carolina pays for it.

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North Carolina lawmakers Tuesday passed fundamental changes to the state's Medicaid program. If Governor Pat McCrory signs it, it would change who's in charge of keeping patients healthy and how the state pays for it.

Governor Pat McCrory's administration will make its new approach to overhauling the state's most expensive health care program official Monday. State health leaders will submit their new plan for Medicaid to the General Assembly.

There's one phrase that you'll be hearing a lot about with our state's Medicaid program: accountable care organization. When you hear that jargon, think: groups of doctors and hospitals.

Dr. Elliott Fisher at Dartmouth College helped develop the concept and unveiled it under a different name in 2006.


Governor Pat McCrory's administration is changing course on its plan to overhaul North Carolina's most expensive health care program. Medicaid serves roughly 1.7 million low-income parents, children, seniors and people with disabilities. McCrory had rolled out a plan that some called a privatization scheme. Now, state leaders are finalizing details on a different approach that they'll present to the General Assembly by March 17.