2016 Election

This election season, we’ve heard a lot about the presidential race, and campaigns for U.S. Senate and governor in North Carolina – and for good reason. We haven't heard much about state legislative races even though the General Assembly has fueled some of the year’s biggest political stories. Think House Bill 2, plus redistricting and changes to voting laws that were struck down in federal court.

Tom Bullock/ WFAE

The week's top stories, including: Presidential candidates and their surrogates are everywhere in North Carolina. The governor’s race tightens. And CMPD’s police chief wants the public to help address issues in the Keith Scott shooting. 

Charlotte Observer

For the first time in 16 years, someone different will occupy the state’s attorney general’s office. Former Democratic state Sen. Josh Stein of Wake County and current Republican state Sen. Buck Newton of Wilson are in a close race to succeed Roy Cooper.

Twitter

Economies of scale is a term well known in the business world. It means a way of saving money if you buy in bulk or better use what you already have.

It’s also a factor in politics.

And may be behind all the attention given two campaign messages sent out by conservatives this week about HB 2.

Early voting lines at Charlotte's Veterans Park in 2012.
Jennifer Lang / WFAE

The number of early votes cast in Mecklenburg County for the Nov. 8 election is behind the pace of early voting in the past two presidential elections, according to figures from the county board of elections. Turnout numbers should start rising faster: More early voting sites opened across North Carolina Thursday. That's welcome news for voters who were deterred by long lines at some polling sites last week.

Nick de la Canal

This week, WFAE is taking time to meet with voters in different parts of Charlotte and ask: what matters to you in this election? Responses so far have ranged from "the economy," "the pharmaceutical industry," to a bewildered "I don't know what matters nowadays."

Today, we visit Veteran's Park in east Charlotte, where we meet Seth Keipper, who's sitting on a bench watching his nine-year-old daughter, Alex, on the swings. Yes, he says, he's been following this election.

Center For Public Integrity

Consider for a moment this number, 66,636.

As of October 24, that is the number of political ads aired in North Carolina this election year. And just for state level races, think governor on down.

Now money in politics, that should not surprise you. But these numbers might. "The estimated cost of those ads is about $32 million." That’s Ben Weider from the Center for Public Integrity. The totals reached by poring through data primarily compiled by Kantar Media.

Donald Trump speaking Wednesday at McGlohon Theatre.
Tom Bullock / WFAE

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump made what amounts to a closing argument during Wednesday's visit to uptown Charlotte. It was an attempt to woo a group of voters who, so far, have largely not been in his camp.

Nick de la Canal

Each day this week, we're going to different areas in Charlotte and asking voters what matters to them in this election. Today, we're visiting traditionally conservative south Charlotte, also known as "the wedge." That's because if you look at all the Charlotte neighborhoods in the top 10 percent socio-economically, they all roughly fall in the south Charlotte area between Providence Rd. and Park Rd. in the shape of, well, a wedge.

Screen Grab via YouTube

Arguably the most influential race on your Election Day ballot is between two men you’ve never heard of. Bob Edmunds and Mike Morgan.

Edmunds is a Republican. Morgan a Democrat. And the victor will decide whether liberals take over or conservative hold their majority on North Carolina’s Supreme Court.

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