Charlotte Talks on WFAE

Weekdays at 9:00 a.m. and Mon-Thurs at 9:00 p.m.
  • Hosted by Mike Collins

You're invited to join the conversation during our live broadcast by E-mail at charlottetalks@wfae.org. Or on Facebook and Twitter

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Ways To Connect

Stories From A Speech Writer

Jul 20, 2015

It is said that Abraham Lincoln wrote the Gettysburg Address on the back of an envelope.  He wrote it himself.  But today, it is common for politicians to turn to speechwriters for that task.  Barton Swaim handled speech writing for South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford at a time of political scandal.  He’s written a funny and eye-opening book about his experiences and shares them with us.

Arts For Activism

Jul 17, 2015
Marcus Kiser and Jason Woodberry

The Harvey B. Gantt Center becomes the nexus of art and activism when two exhibitions open there this weekend. The group AfriCOBRA dates back to 1968 Chicago and the exhibit, AfriCOBRA Now, reveals their shifting aesthetic over 40 years. Meanwhile, Intergalactic Soul was created by a local duo and although vastly different, their works are also infused with social and political undertones.

Ben Bradford / WFAE

Charlotte has a new police chief and you’ll meet Kerr Putney in the first part of this show. A CMPD veteran who rose through the ranks, we talk about his time with the department and how he intends to lead the force during a period when police departments around the country are under increased public scrutiny. Then, we meet a man who is part of a growing movement of photojournalism and exploration called Urban Exploration or “Urbex.” 

Growth In Belmont

Jul 15, 2015
Erin Keever / WFAE

For years, those in the know have referred to Belmont as a hidden gem. Just down I-85 from Charlotte, Belmont started as a railroad and textile hub in the late 1880s and today is thriving with a burgeoning Main Street with restaurants and antique shops, a nearby college and the Daniel Stowe Botanical garden. There’s even talk of bringing trolley service back to town. Belmont is benefiting from the region’s growth and we look into how they’re handling it.

The Co-Housing Trend

Jul 14, 2015

Historically, Charlotte has been a city of suburban neighborhoods. In recent years, a more urban profile has developed with apartments and condominiums cropping up like weeds and now, something new is coming to town: Co-housing. These communities have individual homes but also extensive shared open spaces, playgrounds, courtyards and a common house. Co-housing is about design and a community culture state of mind. 

Gov. Pat McCrory

Jul 13, 2015
Courtesy of the Governor's Office

  

Start the week with Governor Pat McCrory’s take on a variety of topics, among them the state’s budget which has yet to be approved, his proposed infrastructure bonds, on-going disagreements between him and GOP legislators, the controversial plan by the legislature to control redistricting in Greensboro’s local elections, removal of the Confederate Flag from our license plates and more. And we’ll give you the chance to speak with Governor Pat McCrory.

What's The Big Deal With Tiny Houses?

Jul 10, 2015
Photo courtesy of www.thetinylife.com

After years of building McMansions, American home buyers appear to want to downsize, some of them, significantly so. Some are gravitating toward Tiny Houses – homes that are less than 500 square feet.  In fact, last year, Charlotte was the site of the first-ever Tiny House conference where folks learned about how living in a matchbox can significantly reduce their expenses and simplify their lives. 

Tom Bullock / WFAE News

    

The recent shootings at a Charleston church that appear to have been racially motivated along with a series of African-Americans who have lost their lives at the hands of police have re-opened this country’s on-again, off-again conversation on race. Have we ever acknowledged the true nature of the racial tension that seems to grip the country? Can we hold an open, honest conversation on the topic? Is the South’s relationship with race any different from that of the rest of the country?

moodboardphotography / Flickr https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

The number of older Americans is growing, thirteen percent are 65 and older and cities across the country are beginning to prepare for the coming boom. Making a city “age-friendly” isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s necessary to ensure the future economic health of all generations. At least, that’s what one of our guests will tell us as we talk about just what makes a city age-friendly, about the economic benefits of being so and about whether or not Charlotte is age-ready. 

Educator Roundtable

Jul 7, 2015
LizMarie_AK / Flickr/https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

  

Two weeks ago, we talked to officials looking into the frequency and efficacy of testing in the public schools of North Carolina. We heard from a lot of folks including teachers about what was discussed on that program.  It’s often difficult for us to get teachers on our show because, during the school year, they’re in class but not during the summer, so we’re joined by teachers for a follow-up discussion on testing.

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