Special Election In SC's 5th Congressional District; Dem Mayoral Candidates To Hold Public Forum

Jun 20, 2017

South Carolina voters are heading to the polls Tuesday to choose a replacement for former Congressman Mick Mulvaney, who now leads the White House Budget Office. Meanwhile, Charlotte's three Democratic mayoral candidates are preparing for a public forum to be held at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, and legislators in the North Carolina General Assembly are preparing to vote on a proposed state budget deal.

Here are Tuesday afternoon's top headlines on WFAE.

South Carolina Voters To Decide On Replacement For Mulvaney

Voters in South Carolina's 5th Congressional District are heading to the polls Tuesday to choose a replacement for former Congressman Mick Mulvaney, who now leads the White House Budget Office.

The Democrat in the race is Archie Parnell, a former advisor for Goldman Sachs who's running his first campaign for public office. He's campaigned largely on opposing President Donald Trump's budget and health care priorities.

The Republican is Ralph Norman, a real estate developer and former state representative who has sought to align himself with the president. Polls will remain open today until 7 p.m.

Charlotte Democtratic Mayoral Candidates To Hold Public Forum Tuesday

The three Democrats running for Charlotte mayor are preparing for their third public forum, to be held Tuesday night. Jennifer Roberts, Vi Lyles, and Joel Ford all plan to participate in the event, sponsored by the Charlotte chapter of the NAACP.

Mayor Roberts is hoping to fend off her two Democratic challengers to secure a second term in office. Mayor Pro Tem Lyles and state Sen. Ford, meanwhile, are each trying to unseat Roberts. Whoever wins the Sept. 12 primary will face Republican city councilman Kenny Smith in the general election.

Tuesday's forum will be held at Trinity Episcopal School beginning at 6:30 p.m.

Legislators To Begin Voting On North Carolina State Budget Deal

The state budget deal reached by Republicans in the North Carolina General Assembly contains much that lawmakers will support and plenty that could cause Democrats, including Gov. Roy Cooper, to oppose the plan.

The Senate is expected to hold late Tuesday the first of two votes on the final two-year spending plan. The House could follow Wednesday.

The agreement reached by House and Senate GOP negotiators includes pay raises for teachers and state employees and a retiree pension increase. There's also more money for at-risk 4-year-olds to attend preschool.

But the measure doesn't spend as much as Cooper wanted, and he's unhappy with tax cuts again benefiting the wealthy and corporations. And during a time of surpluses, Republicans are directing that spending in Cooper's office be reduced by 10 percent.

Mandatory Driving School For Suspended Drivers OK'd By House

Motorists who've had their North Carolina driver's license suspended for excessive speeding or multiple moving violations would have to take a "driver retraining course" to legally get back on the road under legislation advancing in the General Assembly.

The House voted Monday night for the mandatory 8-hour course conducted by the Division of Motor Vehicles or an outside party. Participants could be charged up to $175.

Before sending the measure to the Senate, the House defeated an amendment to make the course optional. Some critics argued the course is too expensive for drivers.