Ask Me Another
2:16 pm
Thu June 27, 2013

Consonant Weight Loss Plan

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 10:02 am

Like people, words are sometimes a bit thick around the middle. So we've opened a special clinic in which we remove the interior consonants from words, and they emerge slimmer and more confident. For example. if you have the word "story" and remove its interior consonants, you get "soy." This game is a workout for your brain.

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Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Let's say hello to our next two contestants: Thomas Taylor and Jeremy Rubenstein.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Jeremy, are you a word game guy?

JEREMY RUBENSTEIN: You know what, tonight I am. Why not?

EISENBERG: Have you ever solved a crossword puzzle or...

RUBENSTEIN: Yeah, I have.

EISENBERG: Do you ever play Trivial Pursuit?

RUBENSTEIN: Oh, yes.

EISENBERG: Yeah, okay, that won't help you. Thomas, word game guy?

THOMAS TAYLOR: Definitely.

EISENBERG: What's your word game of choice?

TAYLOR: I like to play Boggle a lot.

EISENBERG: All right, well this game is called Consonant Weight Loss Plan. Like people, words sometimes worry that they're a bit thick around the middle, so we've opened a special clinic in which we remove the interior consonants from words and they emerge as slimmer words. Puzzle guru John Chaneski, can you please explain this?

JOHN CHANESKI: We're going to give you a two-part clue. The first part describes the original word and the second describes its slimmed down form, where all the consonants in the middle of the word are removed. For example, if I said it's a tale or narrative that after losing some consonants turns out to be the bean used to make tofu, you would say story and soy.

TAYLOR: Okay.

CHANESKI: Thomas has a look of understanding.

EISENBERG: Jeremy?

CHANESKI: Jeremy not so much.

(LAUGHTER)

TAYLOR: Understanding and fear.

CHANESKI: And fear.

EISENBERG: All right, we'll go nice and slow. This wooden-soled show was whittled down to make a bit of gear work.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jeremy?

RUBENSTEIN: It would be clog for wooden shoe and cog for gear work.

EISENBERG: You got it.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: It's like you just found out you passed the bar. That was the relief.

(LAUGHTER)

EISENBERG: This follower of the Church of Latter Day Saints went on a diet so he could jump as high as this celestial object.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Thomas?

TAYLOR: Mormon and moon.

EISENBERG: Yes, exactly.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: It's how one might describe under seasoned or very plain food and how a gourmet might describe the same food.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Thomas?

TAYLOR: Bland and bad.

EISENBERG: That is correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This dilemma or quandary was solved by reducing it down to a sonnet.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Thomas?

TAYLOR: Problem and poem.

EISENBERG: That's correct.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Adam and Eve had a short little love affair, which they covered up with the leaf of this fruit tree.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Thomas?

TAYLOR: They had a fling and they covered it with fig leaves.

EISENBERG: Yeah, weird, right, but right. That is weird, but you're right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: You could find many types of it on the website Etsy, slim it down to get a popular Etsy animal theme.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Thomas?

TAYLOR: Craft and cat.

EISENBERG: Yes.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: They go hand in hand don't they?

TAYLOR: Absolutely, on the internet.

EISENBERG: The boat was in traffic and not moving, so the captain dropped some consonants and raised this sheet to harness the wind.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Thomas?

TAYLOR: Standstill so he raised the sail.

EISENBERG: Yes, that is correct.

CHANESKI: Brilliant. Well done.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: This is your last question. It's where a bracelet is worn by a clever person such as yourself.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

EISENBERG: Jeremy?

RUBENSTEIN: It's worn on the wrist by a clever person like myself.

EISENBERG: Yeah, just take out the consonants and you can make this happen my friend.

CHANESKI: Take out the R and the S.

(LAUGHTER)

CHANESKI: Throw you a little bone there.

TAYLOR: And keep them about you.

RUBENSTEIN: Wit.

EISENBERG: That's right.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: John Chaneski, how did this come together?

CHANESKI: Thomas wins the game. Way to go, Thomas.

EISENBERG: Jeremy, thank you so much. Thomas, you are the winner of this round and you'll be moving on to our Ask Me One More final round at the end of the show. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.