Tom Goldman

Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his more than 20 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

His pieces are diverse and include both perspective and context. Goldman often explores people's motivations for doing what they do, whether it's solo sailing around the world or pursuing a gold medal. In his reporting, Goldman searches for the stories about the inspirational and relatable amateur and professional athletes.

Goldman contributed to NPR's 2009 Edward R. Murrow award for his coverage of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and to a 2010 Murrow award for contribution to a series on high school football, "Friday Night Lives." Earlier in his career, Goldman's piece about Native American basketball players earned a 2004 Dick Schaap Excellence in Sports Journalism Award from the Center for the Study of Sport in Society at Northeastern University and a 2004 Unity Award from the Radio-Television News Directors Association.

In January 1990, Goldman came to NPR to work as an associate producer for sports with Morning Edition. For the next seven years he reported, edited and produced stories and programs. In June 1997, he became NPR's first full time sports correspondent.

For five years before NPR, Goldman worked as a news reporter and then news director in local public radio. In 1984, he spent a year living on an Israeli kibbutz. Two years prior he took his first professional job in radio in Anchorage, Alaska, at the Alaska Public Radio Network.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. SCOTT SIMON, HOST: Imagine a home whose residents include retired opera singers, jazz musicians and movie and Broadway stars. This is the Lillian Booth Home just outside of New York City. John Kalish visited The Lillian Booth Home and caught up with some of its current residents. JOHN KALISH, BYLINE: Eileen Pepper (ph) is a 71-year-old retired music teacher who moved into The Lillian Booth Home two years ago. EILEEN PEPPER: My...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. AUDIE CORNISH, HOST: The man who led a months-long investigation into Russian doping calls the scandal unprecedented in modern times. Today in a report commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency, he says there were over a thousand Russian athletes involved in state-sponsored doping. That's over a recent four-year period, including the Olympic Games in London and Sochi. NPR's Tom Goldman has more. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Investigator...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: I'm Steve Inskeep here to help you argue about something other than politics - college football. On Sunday, we find out who's in and who's out of all the big bowl games. The selection process always gets people riled up because the big prize here is the college football playoff, now in its third year. Four teams get picked. They play. The winner is the national champion. NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman joins...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: It's been a long time since the Olympics back in 2008 and 2012, but in a way, the games are not over. Authorities have been checking for drug use in those games, retesting old, stored samples. And in the last week alone, they found violations in samples of 28 competitors, including 17 who won medals. This is causing upheaval in Olympic record books and in some lives. NPR's Tom Goldman reports. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE...

Voters in seven more states said "yes" to marijuana this month. Pot now is legal for recreational or medicinal use in more than half the country. It's still against federal law and classified as a Schedule 1 drug, meaning U.S. officials consider marijuana to have a high risk of abuse or harm, and no accepted medical use in treatment. Also, it's still banned in professional sports. Many athletes hope that will change as momentum grows nationwide for legalization. That's especially true in the...

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To say the mood at Progressive Field in Cleveland was electric the last two nights is the understatement of the baseball season. The first two games of the World Series brought sellout crowds, mostly made up of Indians fans, totaling more than 38,000 both nights. Everywhere you turned, there were happy Clevelanders sporting Indians jerseys, jackets, hats and t-shirts. The Cleveland Indians are hot stuff. Which is why it's confusing to check the year's attendance figures. Cleveland ranked 28...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: OK, one game does not decide a World Series. But if you're one game into a World Series, you'd much rather have won it than lost it. The Cleveland Indians beat the Cubs last night 6-0. It happened on the same night that the Cleveland Cavaliers raised their NBA championship banner. NPR's Tom Goldman reports from the city to be in for sports last night. TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: It all came together literally on a small...

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: The World Series that begins tonight in Cleveland is going to change the course of history for one Midwestern city. Maybe that's an exaggeration. I don't know. But the Chicago Cubs have not won a World Series in 108 years. The Cleveland Indians, though, it's been a mere 68 years. NPR's Tom Goldman is in Cleveland, ready for Game 1. And he did what other baseball fans in Cleveland did last night. He went to the...

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