Tom Bullock

Reporter

Tom Bullock decided to trade the khaki clad masses and traffic of Washington DC for Charlotte in 2014. Before joining WFAE, Tom spent 15 years working for NPR.  Over that time he served as everything from an intern to senior producer of NPR’s Election Unit.  Tom also spent five years as the senior producer of NPR’s Foreign Desk where he produced and reported from Iraq, Afghanistan, Yemen, Haiti, Egypt, Libya, Lebanon among others.  Tom is looking forward to finally convincing his young daughter, Charlotte, that her new hometown was not, in fact, named after her.

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WFAE

Yes, my jury duty is over. But uncertainty over just when it would end (and the sun's sudden brief disappearance) meant I had to push back some key interviews to late in the week. Which left me with too little time to finish up a full podcast this week.

But rest assured – we will be back with a full episode next week.

And it's a doozy.

North Carolina Legislative building
jmturner / Wikimedia Commons

Republican leaders of the General Assembly have just one more week to finish and approve new district maps for the state. This by order of a federal court.  

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Six of the eight candidates for mayor of Charlotte debated each other Tuesday at an event sponsored by the League of Women Voters and PBS Charlotte. It was an hour long debate. But let's focus on just one question.

Here's moderator Jeff Sonier: "The city of Charlotte is on record in support of the I-77 toll lane project between uptown and Mooresville. As mayor, would you support the current toll lane project and would you support future toll lane projects in Charlotte and surrounding communities?"

Tom Bullock / WFAE

Large crowds gathered all over North and South Carolina Monday to view the eclipse.

I chose to watch the celestial show with just one other person - someone who has just the right amount of experience to really see it.

That person is six years old.

NCGA

It happened. And those who waited eagerly were finally satisfied.

No, we're not talking about the eclipse.

Today, Republican leaders in the General Assembly released the "stat packs."

NCGA

The new legislative district maps are out. Over the weekend, a joint legislative redistricting committee released its proposals for new state house and senate districts. So what's changed?

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WFAE

Have you noticed? Candidate ME hasn't been on the campaign trail this week. Host Tom Bullock puts on his (family friendly) limerick hat to explain why, and when Candidate ME will return, as best he legally can. 

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In this episode, Tom breaks a campaign promise and asks our political gurus for their pick as the biggest broken political promise in Mecklenburg County.

Then Candidate ME takes a look at absentee mail-in ballots - the potential problems and even a recent scandal with them.

North Carolina Legislative building
jmturner / Wikimedia Commons

When you are carving up the state into new political districts, you don't do it willy-nilly. Especially when you have 28 state legislative seats ruled illegal racial gerrymanders and a federal court watching what you do.

Thursday, we learned just what criteria state lawmakers are going to use in this court ordered round of redistricting.

A select group of state lawmakers returns to Raleigh this morning, to hold another public meeting on redistricting.

They are working to correct 28 state Senate and House districts the U.S. Supreme Court found to be illegal racial gerrymanders.

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