Sarah Delia

Arts & Crime Reporter

At this point in her life, Sarah considers home to be a state of mind—not one place. Before joining the WFAE news team, she was hosting and reporting in the deep south in Birmingham, Alabama. In past lives she was a northerner having worked and lived in Indiana, Maine, and New York City. She grew up in Virginia and attended James Madison University in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley.

Sarah got her start in radio at WXJM, her college radio station where she hosted a talk show, a music program, and helped manage the student run station. It’s also where she made lifelong friends and discovered a love for talking into microphones.

Sarah has interned and worked at NPR in Washington DC, interned and freelanced for WNYC, and attended the Salt Institute for Radio Documentary Studies.

She enjoys telling stories that are off the beaten path. 

Ways to Connect

This week prosecutor Andrew Murray switched courthouses from Mecklenburg County’s to the U.S. district courthouse down the street. Murray is now the top federal prosecutor for Mecklenburg and 31 other counties. He talked about his priorities in his new role as U.S attorney for North Carolina’s Western District and reflected on his seven years as district attorney.


The Levine Museum of the New South will once again be looking for a new staff historian. After two years in that role, Brenda Tindal will be moving on. She’s accepted a position as the director of education at the Detroit Historical Society.

When accusations surfaced that Alabama U.S. Senate candidate Roy Moore initiated a sexual encounter with a 14-year-old, Raleigh lawyer Catherine Lawson responded with the hash tag #MeAt14. She tweeted a photo of herself at that age with the words: "Can’t consent at 14. Not in Alabama. Not anywhere."

It caught on and thousands used the hash tag to tweet pictures of themselves as a way to emphasize that children that age can’t consent to sex. Lawson spoke with WFAE’s Sarah Delia.

The CMPD officer who shot Reuben Galindo will not face criminal charges, says Mecklenburg County District Attorney Andrew Murray.

Galindo, a 29-year-old Hispanic man, called police on the night of September 6th, saying he had a gun with no bullets and wanted officers to come to his home. After a brief encounter with officers, Galindo was shot twice and died steps away from his home. The gun in Galindo's possession did not have ammunition.

Imagine spending more than two decades in prison for a crime you didn’t commit. That's exactly the nightmare that Willie Grimes endured.

The autopsy and toxicology reports for Rueben Galindo were released Tuesday. Galindo, a 29-year-old Hispanic man, was shot and killed by police on the night of September 6. Galindo had called 911 saying he had been drinking and that he had a gun with no bullets. He had requested officers come to his home.

Novant Health

This week Novant Health announced it would be taking to the sky. The health care system’s first helicopter will be based at the Novant Health Rowan Medical Center in Salisbury.

Sarah Delia

The city of Charlotte has made history electing its first African American female mayor. In a landslide victory, Democratic candidate Vi Lyles defeated Republican Kenny Smith.

The Charlotte Museum of History announced that it has selected Adria Focht as its new president and CEO.

Focht comes to Charlotte by way of Kings Mountain, where she was the director and curator of Kings Mountain Historical Museum.

sexual assault test kit
U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Kate Thornton-Maurer

The Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department this week was awarded an $837,342 federal Justice Department grant to help end a backlog of sexual assault cold cases.

About 600 kits that were processed more than 10 years ago will be re-tested at an accredited lab using new DNA-testing technology. Many date back to the 1990s.