Sarah Delia

Arts Reporter

At this point in her life, Sarah considers home to be a state of mind—not one place. Before joining the WFAE news team, she was hosting and reporting in the deep south in Birmingham, Alabama. In past lives she was a northerner having worked and lived in Indiana, Maine, and New York City. She grew up in Virginia and attended James Madison University in the beautiful Shenandoah Valley.

Sarah got her start in radio at WXJM, her college radio station where she hosted a talk show, a music program, and helped manage the student run station. It’s also where she made lifelong friends and discovered a love for talking into microphones.

Sarah has interned and worked at NPR in Washington DC, interned and freelanced for WNYC, and attended the Salt Institute for Radio Documentary Studies.

She enjoys telling stories that are off the beaten path and she’s excited to dive into the arts and culture scene in Charlotte. In her spare time Sarah loves to paint, collect vintage birdcages, pick through old vinyl, spend time with her pets, and turn claw foot bathtubs into couches. 

Ways to Connect

Mint Museum

The Mint Museum announced Monday that its president and CEO is stepping down in June. 


Nick de la Canal / WFAE

The Charlotte Department of Transportation says it is “evaluating” whether to enact a ban on street parking outside a women’s health clinic in east Charlotte. The ban would primarily affect a number of anti-abortion groups that have been staging near-daily protests outside the clinic for at least the last 12 years.

WFAE

Updated June 21, 2017 (Please note the timeline will be updated as more details become available). 

Homicide in Charlotte is on the rise. In 2017, there have been 46. The total number of homicides in 2016 is 67.

CMPD Chief Kerr Putney said in March his department is doing what it can to combat the problem.

Last week almost to the day of the one year anniversary of House Bill 2, a children’s book made some news. “Jacob’s New Dress" was initially picked to be a part of first graders' reading selection in Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools.  But it was pulled after a teacher reportedly complained. Superintendent Ann Clark issued a vague statement citing “concerns” about the book.

What those concerns are exactly, depends on who you ask. The book’s main character is Jacob, a young boy who likes to wear dresses. The book explores how he navigates being picked on in school for doing so. Sarah and Ian Hoffman are the coauthors of the book; they live in California. WFAE’s Sarah Delia spoke to them about the decision to remove the book.

https://gogetfunding.com/keep-gus-home/

A Charlotte high school student charged with embezzling money from a Harris Teeter won’t be deported. But he’ll still be returning to his native country, Mexico. Gus Zamudio had his final immigration hearing Tuesday. 

Tim Parati

You may not know the name Tim Parati, but chances are you’ve seen work by this native Charlottean around the city and on your TV screen. Whether he’s designing a set for a local play, or has a recurring role on the post-apocalyptic show The Walking Dead, Parati has a hard time saying no to creative undertakings.

Many projects keep him busy these days but Children’s Theatre of Charlotte is his home base. Which is where WFAE’s Sarah Delia caught up with Parati to discuss the two very different worlds he lives in.

Sarah Delia

It’s not often that we cover stories involving the theft of less than $3,000, but the case of 18-year-old Gus Zamudio is different because it involves immigration.

Sarah Delia

Residents and businesses along Charlotte’s light rail blue line extension received some bad news this week. The 9-mile line from uptown to UNC Charlotte won’t be opening in August as planned. It’s been delayed until next March. Businesses and residents in Charlotte’s NoDa neighborhood took the news especially hard as they saw August as the light at the end of a massive construction tunnel.

Sarah Delia

Immigration and refugee policies have been on the minds of people across the country, including Charlotte. Tonight WFAE’s Charlotte Talks will hold a Public Conversation event to explore these topics.

For Mayada Idlibi both of these issues hit close to home. She emigrated from Syria in the 1980’s. Today she works with refugees placed in Charlotte.  WFAE’s Sarah Delia spoke with Idlibi about her journey to America and the challenges of helping refugees settle into their new home.

Sarah Delia

The Excelsior Club, Charlotte’s first African American-owned club, is officially in foreclosure. It opened in 1944, and at one point it was a center for African American social and political activity on Charlotte’s west side.

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