Peter Kenyon

Peter Kenyon is NPR's international correspondent based in Istanbul, Turkey.

Prior to taking this assignment in 2010, Kenyon spent five years in Cairo covering Middle Eastern and North African countries from Syria to Morocco. He was part of NPR's team recognized with two Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University awards for outstanding coverage of post-war Iraq.

In addition to regular stints in Iraq, he has followed stories to Yemen, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Lebanon, Bahrain, Qatar, Algeria, Morocco and other countries in the region.

Arriving at NPR in 1995, Kenyon spent six years in Washington, D.C., working in a variety of positions including as a correspondent covering the US Senate during President Bill Clinton's second term and the beginning of the President George W. Bush's administration.

Kenyon came to NPR from the Alaska Public Radio Network. He began his public radio career in the small fishing community of Petersburg, where he met his wife Nevette, a commercial fisherwoman.

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Europe
6:11 am
Fri April 11, 2014

A Trip Into Odessa's Rich, Dark History

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 7:37 am

As Ukraine seeks international help to bring Crimea back from Russian control, residents of Odessa watching warily. The historic Black Sea port has been conquered repeatedly throughout history.

Middle East
5:03 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Divisive Issues For Now Don't Derail Iran Nuclear Talks

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 8:02 am

Tensions between Russia and Ukraine have left Moscow on the outs with Germany, France, Britain and the U.S. Those countries are partnered with Russia in talks with Iran over its nuclear program.

Europe
6:33 am
Fri April 4, 2014

After Crimea Takeover, Ukraine Moves To Protect Odessa

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

With the Crimean peninsula effectively controlled by Russia, Ukrainian officials worry about another Black Sea port, Odessa. Ukraine fears this area with a Russian minority could be a tempting target.

Parallels
5:40 pm
Tue April 1, 2014

Still Reeling From Crisis, Ukraine Prepares For Presidential Vote

Boxer-turned-opposition leader Vitali Klitschko, right, dropped out of Ukraine's presidential election set for May 25. He says he will help business tycoon and politician Petro Poroshenko, left, who made a fortune selling chocolates. He favors closer ties with the West.
Anatoliy Stepanov AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 12:11 am

After a winter of lightning-fast changes – a president ousted and a peninsula apparently lost to Russia — Ukrainians are beginning to look ahead to elections on May 25 to replace Viktor Yanukovych.

The opposition leader who seemed to have the inside track a few weeks ago, ex-world champion heavyweight Vitali Klitschko, has taken himself out of the running. Klitschko will stand for mayor of Kiev and throw his support behind billionaire Petro Poroshenko, who made his fortune in the candy business.

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Europe
6:18 am
Mon March 31, 2014

Ukrainians Open Their Homes To Crimean Refugees

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 7:55 am

Transcript

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And I'm David Greene.

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Europe
4:12 pm
Thu March 27, 2014

IMF Bailout Comes With A Hefty Side Of Pain For Ukrainians

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 7:03 pm

Transcript

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News
4:24 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Even Turkey's President Evades Its New Twitter Ban

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 6:22 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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Europe
5:13 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Turkey Lacks Strong Position In Russia-Ukraine Crisis

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 11:27 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And as Gregory said a few moments ago, the outcome of the referendum in Crimea is of particular interest to the Tatars, that minority community of Muslims that has a history of being oppressed by Russia. The Tatars have linguistic and religious ties to Turkey, just across the Black Sea. NPR's Peter Kenyon reported from Crimea last week, and has now returned to his base in Istanbul. He says that while Turkey might want to assert itself regionally and stand up for the Tatars, there's a limit to how much it can influence events.

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Europe
5:31 am
Thu March 6, 2014

Russia May Expedite Passports For Ukraine's Ethnic Russians

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 8:39 am

With no end in sight to the Ukraine crisis, Russian lawmakers say they're considering a bill to make it easier for ethnic Russians and other Ukrainians to obtain Russian passports.

Europe
4:35 pm
Wed March 5, 2014

Kremlin Tells Reporters Not To Believe Their Eyes In Crimea

Originally published on Wed March 5, 2014 8:42 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Russian President Vladimir Putin says Moscow has not sent troops to Crimea, despite being authorized to do so. Russia's defense minister says reports of Russian forces fanning out across Crimea are complete nonsense. And yet, Ukrainian and Western officials, as well as witnesses and journalists in Crimea tell a very different story. NPR's Peter Kenyon joins us from the Crimean capitol of Simferopol.

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